Dream Studies – Indigo Dreams http://indigodreams.net/ Sat, 05 Jun 2021 04:23:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://indigodreams.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1.png Dream Studies – Indigo Dreams http://indigodreams.net/ 32 32 NJ Orthodox Jewish athlete Beatie Deutsch is the face of new Adidas ad https://indigodreams.net/nj-orthodox-jewish-athlete-beatie-deutsch-is-the-face-of-new-adidas-ad/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 23:44:53 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/nj-orthodox-jewish-athlete-beatie-deutsch-is-the-face-of-new-adidas-ad/ At first glance, Beatie Deutsch seems an unlikely celebrity athlete. The Passaic native is an ultra-Orthodox mother of five who speaks openly about her Jewish faith, prays daily, and dresses modestly with a headscarf and knee-length skirt, even in competition. Other professional athletes might avoid such outfits for fear of slowing their pace. But the […]]]>

At first glance, Beatie Deutsch seems an unlikely celebrity athlete.

The Passaic native is an ultra-Orthodox mother of five who speaks openly about her Jewish faith, prays daily, and dresses modestly with a headscarf and knee-length skirt, even in competition.

Other professional athletes might avoid such outfits for fear of slowing their pace. But the self-proclaimed “Marathon Mother” – now the face of an international advertising campaign for Adidas – has won races and broken records since joining the running circuit five years ago.

The 31-year-old is also a powerful voice representing ultra-Orthodox women, a group that has traditionally avoided publicity. Deutsch, who grew up as “Speedy Beatie” in the gyms of Passaic, openly shares his spiritual ideas as well as his triumphs and struggles with thousands of followers on social media.

Beatie Deutsch crossing the finish line at the Miami Half Marathon. "I see my belief pushing me forward" she said in a new ad campaign for Adidas.

She ran her second race when she was seven months pregnant with her fifth child, placed first in the Jerusalem Marathon in 2018 and won the Israel National Championship in 2019. She won half marathons in Latvia and Tel Aviv in 2019 and Miami last year.

His journey to athletic stardom has seen many turning points: Deutsch has battled leg injuries and health issues including anemia and celiac disease. She had long dreamed of competing in the Tokyo Olympics and, as a champion on three continents, was ready to compete until disappointment struck – twice.




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Indian students plan to return to UK universities despite lockdown https://indigodreams.net/indian-students-plan-to-return-to-uk-universities-despite-lockdown/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 16:24:02 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/indian-students-plan-to-return-to-uk-universities-despite-lockdown/ Indian students remain positive about the possibility of taking their courses at UK universities this year despite the coronavirus lockdown and travel constraints, official data shows. According to statistics from the UK Home Office released last week, the number of study visas granted to Indian nationals in the year ending March 2021 increased by 6,391, […]]]>

Indian students remain positive about the possibility of taking their courses at UK universities this year despite the coronavirus lockdown and travel constraints, official data shows.

According to statistics from the UK Home Office released last week, the number of study visas granted to Indian nationals in the year ending March 2021 increased by 6,391, marking a 13% increase compared to the previous year.

This indicates that most students want to take their classes because they can return to college since the lockdown was eased from May 17.

“The return of our students in person is an important step in the recovery of COVID-19 in the UK, and a positive sign for Indian students with offers to study in the UK next year,” said Vivienne Stern, Director of UK International Universities (UUKi), an organization representing 146 UK universities.

“We are grateful to our member universities and all students for their incredible work, patience and resilience during this time. Throughout this time, universities have placed the well-being of their students at the heart of what they are doing. ‘they are and have shown flexibility to allow students to pursue their dream of embarking on higher education in the UK in a safe manner,’ she said.

UKi said universities have done a lot of work in addition to moving to e-learning, focusing on student health and well-being, including providing food packages, funding for students. difficulties and support for well-being.

International education specialists IDP Connect monitored student attitudes and motivations towards university study during the pandemic through their International Student Crossroads reports and their April research shows that 83% of Indian students with an offer to study in the UK in the fall are planning to start their studies as planned, around September.

When asked if they would start their studies if it involved traveling to the UK and then taking their education through a mix of online and face-to-face sessions, an overwhelming majority 94% of Indian respondents said they would start their studies under such circumstances. .

“Over the past few years, thousands of additional Indian students have chosen to trust UK higher education to build their career path, and UK universities are eager to welcome their Indian students again as the country is reopening, ”said Barbara Wickham. , Director, British Council India.

“As Indian students plan to return to the UK, we encourage them to connect with their universities and follow the travel rules for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, where appropriate, ”she said.

Under current rules, Indians with a valid student visa can travel to the UK but must follow the “red list” travel requirement of a mandatory 10-day quarantine at a facility approved by the government as part of measures to control the spread of the Delta variant of COVID-19.

There have been calls for university accommodation to be approved for this self-isolation purpose as well.

As part of several measures in place, university and health authorities have stressed that Indian students arriving in the UK in the coming months will also be able to access vaccinations by registering with a local doctor upon arrival.

The coronavirus has so far claimed 128,075 lives in the UK, along with 4,515,779 confirmed infections, according to Johns Hopkins University.

This story was posted from an agency feed with no text editing. Only the title has been changed.

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Racial wealth gap may be key to other inequalities – Harvard Gazette https://indigodreams.net/racial-wealth-gap-may-be-key-to-other-inequalities-harvard-gazette/ Thu, 03 Jun 2021 19:51:44 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/racial-wealth-gap-may-be-key-to-other-inequalities-harvard-gazette/ Around this time, college graduation rates began to decline and the overall high school graduation rate stabilized. For Goldin and Katz, expanding access to higher education could actually help reduce inequalities. “You could eliminate a lot of the inequalities by increasing the education of people with limited ability to access and complete college education,” Goldin […]]]>

Around this time, college graduation rates began to decline and the overall high school graduation rate stabilized. For Goldin and Katz, expanding access to higher education could actually help reduce inequalities.

“You could eliminate a lot of the inequalities by increasing the education of people with limited ability to access and complete college education,” Goldin said.

The problem of wealth inequality is more extreme than income inequality since the former builds on the latter, Katz said, and their effects persist across generations. The legacy of the Jim Crow era and anti-black racism is expressed today in residential segregation, housing discrimination and discrimination in the workforce.

For Katz, who studies housing discrimination and its effects on upward mobility, public policies can be implemented to reduce residential segregation. A study co-authored by Katz with Chetty and Nathaniel Hendren, professor of economics, found that when low-income families move to less poor neighborhoods, with the help of housing vouchers and assistance, it is “Likely to reduce the persistence of poverty across generations.” . Chetty and Hendren, along with John Friedman of Brown University, were the co-founding directors of the now expanded Equality of Opportunity project called Opportunity Insights, based at Harvard.

Growing inequalities are destroying the chances of having a better life than the previous generation. Recent figures show that the richest 1% have seen their wages increase by 157% over the past four decades, while the wages of the poorest 90% have only increased by 24%.

“The American dream sort of shifted from a dream in which the nation’s economic growth was more shared through income distribution,” Goldin said. “Now it’s basically a lottery. It’s like we all go on, buy a ticket to the lotto game, and a few out of the millions are going to win it. And the rest of the people won’t share that. “

To keep the American dream alive and return to the era of shared prosperity, the government must act, Katz said. Goldin and Katz both believe that expanding investment in higher education infrastructure and access to high-quality college education would have a powerful impact on the lives of many Americans. This could be similar to the effects of the high school movement, which lifted millions of American families out of poverty in the first half of the 20th century.

“At the turn of the 20th century, we made it possible for everyone to go to high school,” Katz said. “We never did this for college, even though college is as essential today as high school was 100 years ago.”

Additional benefits of higher education

The economic payoffs of a college degree are great, but the social payoffs are also great, said Anthony Jack, assistant professor of education at the Graduate School of Education.

“The more educated workers tend to work in jobs that are more resistant to the recession and the pandemic,” said Jack, who also holds the Shutzer Assistant Chairs at the Radcliffe Institute. “They also tend to live longer, have better health outcomes, and be more civically engaged. Education means more than extra dollars in the bank. It is also the constellation of things that go with it.

But the road to university has become increasingly difficult, especially for those with low incomes, even as access to university for disadvantaged students has increased over the past two decades. A Pew Research Center report found that the number of enrolled undergraduates from low-income backgrounds increased from 12% in 1996 to 20% in 2016. Most of this growth has taken place in public colleges. two years and less selective institutions.



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DVIDS – News – Original Colombian pursues his dream as an army aviator: Part 1 https://indigodreams.net/dvids-news-original-colombian-pursues-his-dream-as-an-army-aviator-part-1/ Wed, 02 Jun 2021 02:17:00 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/dvids-news-original-colombian-pursues-his-dream-as-an-army-aviator-part-1/ BOGOTÁ – As Chief Warrant Officer 3 Mauricio Garcia and his Colombian counterpart of the security officer, Captain Cristian Castiblanco, walk the flight line at a Colombian army base, inspecting for security risks and violations , he couldn’t help but marvel at how his life has come full circle. Garcia, a UH-60M Black Hawk pilot […]]]>

BOGOTÁ – As Chief Warrant Officer 3 Mauricio Garcia and his Colombian counterpart of the security officer, Captain Cristian Castiblanco, walk the flight line at a Colombian army base, inspecting for security risks and violations , he couldn’t help but marvel at how his life has come full circle.

Garcia, a UH-60M Black Hawk pilot and aviation safety officer, is deployed here as part of a Spanish-speaking technical assistance team from the Security Assistance Command training unit, the Security Assistance Training Management Organization, based in Fort Bragg, North Carolina. .

The Colombian Ministry of Defense is funding TAFT’s five-person team, through an overseas military sales package, to advise the Colombian military on how to run and manage its Advance Rotary Wing School, as well as its aviation safety, procurement, logistics and maintenance programs.

Due to his unique background and life path, Garcia’s official role as an Air Safety Officer is regularly overshadowed by the cultural, linguistic and in-depth knowledge he has accumulated over the past 20 years.

In the beginning

Born in Medellín, Colombia, to working-class parents, he enjoyed going to the local airport to watch planes take off and land, knowing that one day his dream of flying could come true.

“My dad was a transit agent and my mom worked in a beauty spa, so I knew it would be very difficult for my parents to pay for flight school,” Garcia said. “My only chance to realize my dream was to join the Colombian Army or the Air Force.”

At 16 and straight out of high school, he enrolled in the Colombian Officers Academy to prepare him for a career as an officer in the military and, hopefully, in the cockpit of a winged plane. fixed or rotary wing.

Unlike military academies in the United States, students in Colombian military schools have to fund the tuition on their own. In 1999, that was about $ 1,200 per semester, plus Garcia’s cost of living alone in Bogota, where the school was located. Garcia’s parents worked hard to make sure he could stay in school.

In December 2003, after three difficult years away from home, with long hours spent studying military science and dual-track law at the military academy, Garcia graduated at age 19.

He soon found himself assigned as a second lieutenant in an army infantry battalion, contrary to what he expected, leading soldiers against terrorist and insurgent groups like the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known under the name of FARC.

Over the next six years, Garcia did what infantrymen do, taking advanced training such as Counter Guerrilla classes, the Urban Special Forces School, and graduating from the exhausting Lancero School.

Built in collaboration between the US military and the Colombian military, the Lancero school was the result of a request in the mid-1950s by the then President of Colombia, Lieutenant-General Gustavo Rojas Pinilla, who asked the US military to help them build an advanced tactics school for their military leaders. U.S. Army Capt. Ralph Puckett, a Ranger assigned to the 65th Puerto Rico Infantry Regimental Combat Team, had the experience and language skills to make it happen.

Puckett and his team led this effort from 1955 to 1957 and built the foundation for what is known today as the Escuela de Lanceros, or Lancero School.

“One of my proudest memories of my time in the Colombian military was graduating from Lancero School,” said Garcia, who still wears this tab on his uniform.

However, after six years in the military, sometimes spending months in the Colombian jungle working on anti-narcotic operations, Garcia knew it was time for a change.

“I left the Colombian army because I never had the opportunity to fly,” he said.

Irony

As Garcia prepared to do a year of community service as a trainee lawyer, a prerequisite for receiving his law certificate, fate presented him with an unexpected turning point when his uncle from Miami, Fla., Invited him in. in the United States to study English.

“I never saw coming to the United States as an opportunity, mainly because I didn’t speak English,” he said. “But I wanted to learn English to better prepare myself for a future career as a lawyer in Colombia.”

In 2007, Garcia moved to Miami to begin classes at a community college. After his Colombian girlfriend visited, they discovered that their relationship would change with an unexpected arrival.

“She comes from a very conservative family, so we got married,” Garcia said. “My wife was an American citizen by birth, and after we decided to stay and live in the United States, I told my wife that the minimum I can do is serve my new home country.”

Even without the language skills he thought he needed, Garcia enlisted in the US military in September 2008, where he spent the first eight months at the Defense Language Institute in San Antonio.

“I passed my proficiency test and was sent for basic training at Fort Sill, Oklahoma,” he said.

After basic training, Garcia moved on to his professional military training at Fort Sam Houston as a 68J Medical Logistics Specialist, which involved receiving, storing, and distributing medical supplies.

Over the next four years, Garcia served with the 31st Combat Support Hospital in Fort Bliss, Texas, deployed to Afghanistan in 2009, returning to El Paso, and then in 2011 moved the family to Washington, DC, when ‘he took an assignment at Walter Reed’s Army Medical Center.

“When Walter Reed closed (due to a decision to realign and close the base), I had to decide between going to Bethesda or to the Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, where I ultimately decided to go, ”he said. “Even after moving to Fort Belvoir and helping to open the hospital in January 2012, I was thinking about getting on a plane and how to get there.”

Discover in Part 2 how Chief Warrant Officer 3 Garcia’s career changed through a chance encounter with an Army Air Safety Officer.

Editor’s Note: On May 21, 2021, retired Col. Ralph Puckett received the Medal of Honor for his exploits during the Korean War.

Date taken: 06.01.2021
Date posted: 06.01.2021 22:17
Story ID: 397879
Location: BOGOTA, CO
Hometown: MEDELLIN, CO

Web Views: 3
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Tuesday, June 1, 2021 horoscope https://indigodreams.net/tuesday-june-1-2021-horoscope/ Tue, 01 Jun 2021 05:27:44 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/tuesday-june-1-2021-horoscope/ Lunar alert After 4.30am, there are no restrictions on purchases or important decisions. The moon is in Pisces. Aries (March 21-April 19) Make sure you have plenty of time to attend your trips and appointments, as Mercury’s demotion results in transportation delays. Let’s actively work on things that can cause problems, like auto repairs. Be […]]]>

Lunar alert

After 4.30am, there are no restrictions on purchases or important decisions. The moon is in Pisces.

Aries (March 21-April 19)

Make sure you have plenty of time to attend your trips and appointments, as Mercury’s demotion results in transportation delays. Let’s actively work on things that can cause problems, like auto repairs. Be patient with silly mistakes and cluttered communication.

Taurus (April 20 to May 20)

You are in the retrograde suffering of Mercury. This is why checks and other payments by mail are delayed. Many financial problems will remain stuck on the surface. But you can find what you have lost. (Yeah!) It’s also a great opportunity to do the old work.

Gemini (May 21-June 20)

Mercury is your ruler and this retrograde Mercury occurs in Gemini! “Lions, tigers, bears, wow!” This is why you meet your ex-partners and old friends. It is also the reason for broken promises, misplaced articles and interrupted communications. courage!

Cancer (June 21-July 22)

In general, Mercury retrograde causes delays, confusion, and errors. However, Mercury retrogrades are different because they occur with different codes. This particular retrograde Mercury is useful for research and past research. Premium!

Leo (July 23-August 22)

Mercury Retrograde keeps you in touch with your friends from the past. You can also hear from members of long-standing groups, clubs and organizations. This can cause some people to rethink some of the goals they created previously.

Virgo (23 August-22 September)

Mercury retrogradation occurs at the top of the chart, so you may be contacted by your boss, parents, or authorities who haven’t been in contact for some time. It may be good, but maybe not. It’s also an opportunity to market your old ideas to your boss.

Libra (September 23-October 22)

You can use this current Mercury retrograde to complete important treatises and manuscripts, study history, and do past studies. You can also keep in touch with people from other countries and cultures that you haven’t met in a while. It is an interesting and potentially productive time.

SSS (October 23-November 21)

Today’s Mercury Retrograde brings mistakes and delays, but it also helps bring together old businesses related to shared ownership, inheritance, taxes, debt, and whatever else you share and own. with others. If you want to do something, it’s easy.

Sagittarius (November 22-December 21)

This current retrograde Mercury is on the other side of your sign. It almost certainly ensures that you are thinking, dreaming, and meeting old partners and old friends. For some reason, these people are returning to your world and the spirit stream.

Capricorn (December 22-January 19)

The current mercury retrograde will continue until June 22. Please note: the shadow period lasts until July 8. Therefore, it is wise to wait until July 8 or later when purchasing ground transportation, computers or cell phones.

Aquarius (January 20 to February 18)

Many of you meet old flames, talk about them, dream and remember them. (Interestingly, some old flames are easy to forget, and some are memorable.)

Pisces (February 19 to March 20)

This retrograde Mercury attracts loved ones to your doorstep. (Fill up your fridge.) But it’s also a great opportunity to work on any home repairs you’ve avoided.

If your birthday is today

Actress Teri Polo (1969) shares your birthday. You are creative, witty and laid back. You’re laid back and restless, so think twice before you tackle anything. You like the freedom to be spontaneous. This year you have to decide what you want to promote your happiness. You can also be in the spotlight. This year is also a great year for personal, professional and romantic relationships.



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Should COVID cancel the Olympics (again)? https://indigodreams.net/should-covid-cancel-the-olympics-again/ Mon, 31 May 2021 11:54:54 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/should-covid-cancel-the-olympics-again/ For reasons less than perfectly clear to me, Yahoo finance keeps inviting me to come back not to finances, but to the pandemic and public health. Whenever we do this, we usually have a common understanding before the relevant topics of interest. For my most recent interview, however, one of the presenters surprised me by […]]]>

For reasons less than perfectly clear to me, Yahoo finance keeps inviting me to come back not to finances, but to the pandemic and public health.

Whenever we do this, we usually have a common understanding before the relevant topics of interest. For my most recent interview, however, one of the presenters surprised me by asking: should the Olympics be canceled?

I gave the most obvious answer – before improvising a bit on the risk / benefit tradeoffs: it’s not up to me. However, I have since found myself preoccupied, wondering what the decision should be and what it would be if it have been to me. The answer seems obvious enough: to require vaccination of all participants.

Before a story of ideology starts to stir up dogma, let’s be clear that it wouldn’t “force” anyone to get the vaccine. It would be a case of “if you want A, you have to do B. By analogy, no one is “required” to obtain a driver’s license, but you must get one if you want to drive on public roads. Likewise, anyone can withdraw from the Olympics; but adhering to it would mean getting vaccinated.

Let’s start with the basis of the Olympic controversy, which clearly induces dissenting passions and attracts fairly widespread attention. There is a clear argument against holding the Olympics now: They have potential as a COVID19 super-spreader event.

This risk is compounded by incredibly low vaccination rates in Japan, the host country, as well as rising SARS-CoV-2 transmission rates in Japan earlier, as the Games approach.

But there are also compelling arguments for it. For the great mass of us who are not directly involved, the world could just use an invigorating dose of Olympic medicine right now. The Olympics remind us of both why and how to combine national pride with global humanism. They inspire us with indelible demonstrations of human achievement pushing back the frontiers of the possible. Advancing the limits of human potential is not limited to sport, and the Olympic example is a spur of all these ambitions. Ultimately, the Eternal Olympic Flame is a beacon of hope – for the better, faster, stronger, higher in each of us, and for all of us – and the world could sorely do with such hope in this. moment.

All of this says nothing about the athletes themselves. The fulfilled dreams of a small number of athletes may be trivial compared to the pandemic plight of millions of people. But then again, the fate of dreams has intrinsic value. If anything distinguishes the sanctity of human life, it is the infusion of life for the purpose of living it. The Olympic dreams and the ardor which they impose embody the allocation of life to the demanding demands of a determined life. I see something important in this that goes far beyond the dreams of athletes, to the very foundations of human dream and purpose. It might be romanticism on my part, but the Olympics are about love.

Even if we limit the relevance of dreaming to athletes only, there is merit there. For that select group representing the outer limits of human performance, the Olympics can literally be a once in a lifetime opportunity. Canceling them not once, but twice would surely be one of the measures of the pandemic’s toll on both lives and their lives.

Let us now see how the vaccination required for all – for which there is still time to act quickly, and for which stocks of unused vaccine are clearly available – addresses valid concerns and mitigates relevant risks.

Since the widespread deployment of the various COVID vaccines, we have gathered extensive and concrete evidence that fully vaccinated people are very unlikely to contract COVID, are extremely unlikely to contract severe COVID, and are very unlikely to transmit COVID. As a result, rates of viral transmission or disease to, from or within the Olympic population of athletes, coaches, staff and spectators would be extremely low if all were vaccinated in advance.

To be clear, the risk may not be zero, but neither is the risk for any other infectious disease on the planet. The risk of “getting sick” after attending an event, anywhere, in a large congregation has never been zero.

We had never previously demanded “zero risk of getting sick with anything” as a gathering criterion, and neither should we now. The idea that only zero risk is acceptable is one of the many distortions induced by the pandemic. It is nonsense. We can only approach zero risk to life and physical integrity if we stop living our lives or using our limbs a lot. Few of us would sign up for this.

If the risk of COVID – both transmission and damage – is equal to or less than the predominant threshold for “background noise” of epidemiological risk, then the disruption of societal norms is no longer necessary, nor justified. This appears to be the case for vaccinated populations, and we are therefore witnessing rapid changes in public policies.

But what about the Olympic population mingling with the general population of Tokyo, where vaccination rates are low? There are three relevant considerations here:

1) Vaccination will largely protect the Olympic population against acquisition of COVID even if exposed to it among the unvaccinated Japanese host population.

2) This risk could be further reduced by limiting the mixing of these two populations and, for example, by requiring vaccination of all staff and guests in indoor facilities (eg, hotels, restaurants) serving the Olympics.

3) As an additional precaution, the measures previously relied on – distance, masking – could be maintained for interactions outside the Olympic venue.

The benefits of these fairly obvious measures go beyond whether to host our Olympics and prevent them from being a very widespread event.

They would also demonstrate the potential of many other public / private partnerships to help immunize a higher percentage of the world’s population. In this case, the resources of all those with a vested interest in the Olympic Games – the host country, the IOC, the media involved, corporate sponsors, governments sending athlete delegations – could be coordinated to ensure immunization. efficiency of all participants. Pooled resources could and should be directed towards obtaining and administering the necessary vaccines.

Once this ground is broken, why stop on the outskirts of an Olympic village? The world should seek out all reasonable interest groups that might replicate this effort.

The world – to say nothing of the athletes and their lives of intense and urgent preparation – could really do with the Olympics now. The last thing the world needs, however, as we sail into the light at the end of our pandemic tunnel, is a global super-spread event to push us back.

The solidly validated efficacy and safety of COVID vaccination, and the feats of science that got us here in record time, provide us with the means to retain the many benefits while avoiding, almost completely, any risk specific to the virus. pandemic of the holding of these Olympic Games in Tokyo. in July.

We have the means to save these Olympics and to protect public health as well. It would be my choice. With these settings in place, my answer to this question, if it were up to me, becomes: let the games begin.



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ABC7 honors pride month | Resources and information https://indigodreams.net/abc7-honors-pride-month-resources-and-information/ Sat, 29 May 2021 18:30:21 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/abc7-honors-pride-month-resources-and-information/ June Pride Month is an opportunity to honor and celebrate the LGBTQ + community and its allies. ABC7 Eyewitness News will run a series of stories about the LGBTQ + community throughout the month. ABC7 will also present the “Thrive with Pride Celebration” celebration, Saturday June 12 at 9 p.m. on ABC7. Join ABC7 hosts […]]]>
June Pride Month is an opportunity to honor and celebrate the LGBTQ + community and its allies. ABC7 Eyewitness News will run a series of stories about the LGBTQ + community throughout the month.

ABC7 will also present the “Thrive with Pride Celebration” celebration, Saturday June 12 at 9 p.m. on ABC7.

Join ABC7 hosts Ellen Leyva and Brandi Hitt, as well as special guest host Raven-Symoné as they celebrate Pride in SoCal. Karl Schmid and Eric Resendiz will report on the special.

We’ll spotlight the local LGBTQ + people who make a difference, from lawmakers to essential workers.

We’ll hear personal stories from the LGBTQ + community, as well as special performances by LGBTQ + ally and Backstreet Boy AJ McLean and the Los Angeles Gay Men’s Chorus.

Here are organizations working to support LGBTQ + people and their allies in our community and across the country.

Los Angeles AIDS Walk
aidswalkla.org
AIDS Walk LA is the world’s first walk to fight HIV and AIDS. That’s right – 35 years ago a bunch of sick activists, patients, advocates and friends put their soles on the line to shake up the government during the AIDS crisis. And it happened in the streets of Los Angeles.

APLA Health
aplahealth.org
APLA Health’s mission is to achieve equity in health care and promote the well-being of LGBT and other underserved communities and people living with and affected by HIV.

Diversity collective
collective diversityvc.org
Diversity Collective is a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit community organization governed by a volunteer board of directors and advisory board. Our mission is to promote advocacy, education, mental and physical health for the LGBTQ community and those affected by HIV and AIDS in Ventura County, California. We do this work through our community resource center, community building programs and events.

Gay Therapy Center – LA
thegaytherapycenter.com
Since 2016, the Gay Therapy Center in Los Angeles has helped hundreds of Los Angeles clients at their offices in West Hollywood, Los Feliz, Westwood, and Santa Monica. While the goal is to make therapy convenient and close to your home or office, their main goal is to put you in touch with a therapist that you will truly be in touch with. Each Gay Therapy Center therapist is fully licensed by the State of California. LA psychotherapists have an average of ten years of experience and many have over twenty years of experience.

GLAAD – Chapter LA
glaad.org
GLAAD Los Angeles hosts media series showcasing queer art and storytelling, including OUTFEST. GLAAD rewrites script for LGBTQ acceptance. As a dynamic media force, GLAAD tackles difficult issues to shape the narrative and spark a dialogue that leads to cultural change. GLAAD protects all that has been accomplished and creates a world where everyone can live the life they love.

GLSEN – Chapter LA
glsen.org
GLSEN Los Angeles is a chapter of GLSEN, a national organization that fights for the right of every student to a safe and supportive education. GLSEN LA is a local initiative, working locally in our community to ensure safe schools for all students, regardless of sexual orientation and gender identity. There are 43 chapters across the country.

LA Pride / Christopher Street West Association
lapride.org
Christopher Street West (CSW), a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit, organized the world’s first authorized gay rights parade on June 28, 1970 to commemorate the Stonewall Rebellion on Christopher Street in New York the year before. Over 50 years later, we have built a rich history as an active voice of the LGBTQ + community in the Greater Los Angeles area. Although we are best known for producing the LA Pride Parade & Festival, we also organize, sponsor or support other community events throughout the year, and work with our non-profit, philanthropic, community and corporate partners. to promote diversity, equity and inclusion.

Latin American Alliance for Equality
latinoequalityalliance.org
The mission of the Latino Equality Alliance (LEA) is to advocate for the equity, safety and well-being of the Latinx Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer + community. As a non-profit organization with a strong focus on family acceptance, LGBT equality and immigration reform; LEA engages leaders and organizations of the LGBT Latinx community in direct action, organizing to tackle issues of harassment, homophobia, xenophobia, family separation, violence against young people, homelessness, high health risk behaviors and HIV / AIDS.

Long Beach LGBTQ Center
centerlb.org
The Long Beach LGBTQ Center advances equity for LGBTQ people through culturally appropriate advocacy, education, programs and services. We envision affirming communities where all LGBTQ people live in health, well-being, security and prosperity.

LGBTQ OC Center
lgbtqcenteroc.org
At the CO Center LGBTQ, all members and allies of Orange County’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community come together in a network of support and unity. Our life affirmation programs focus on empowerment, and our advocacy efforts focus on speaking out against hate and discrimination. We exist so that every segment of the LGBTQ population in Orange County has the resources to thrive in their own lives and communities. The Orange County LGBTQ Center provides services to more than 14,000 people each year across a wide range of cultures, ethnicities, ages and economic backgrounds.

Riverside LGBTQ + Center
rivcocenter.org
The vision of the Riverside LGBTQ + Center is: To guide and support the local LGBTQ + community and its allies. To help them become who they aspire to be. To achieve their goals with courage and pride. Forming friendships and bonds with community members through different programs that will inspire them to do their best. Be free. Love everyone and be loved by everyone.

Los Angeles LGBT Center
lalgbtcenter.org
Since 1969, the Los Angeles LGBT Center has cared for, advocated for, and celebrated LGBT individuals and families in Los Angeles and beyond. The Center provides services to more LGBT people than any other organization in the world, offering programs, services and global advocacy that span four broad categories: health, social services and housing, culture and education, leadership and advocacy.

An archive
onearchives.org
ONE Archives Foundation Inc. is the independent community partner that supports USC’s National Gay and Lesbian Archives in USC Libraries, the largest repository of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) records in Canada. world. Today, the organization is dedicated to promoting this important resource through a variety of activities, including educational initiatives, fundraising, and a range of public programs.

Out & Equal Work Defenders
outandequal.org
Out & Equal is the first organization working exclusively on LGBTQ equality in the workplace. They partner with Fortune 1000 companies, government agencies and organizations across industries and various missions to provide LGBTQ executive leadership development, comprehensive D&I training and consultation, and professional networking opportunities that create environments inclusive and welcoming workplaces.

The Trevor project
thetrevorproject.org
Founded in 1998 by the creators of the Oscar-winning short TREVOR, The Trevor Project is the leading national organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender youth. , queer and questioning (LGBTQ) under 25. .

The Las Memorias Wall
thewalllasmemorias.org
The Wall Las Memorias is a community health and wellness organization dedicated to serving Latinos, LGBTQs, and other underserved populations through advocacy, education, and generation leadership training.

Trans can work
transcanwork.org
Trans Can Work (TCW) is a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit based in Los Angeles, California and is committed to promoting inclusion in the workplace through innovative training strategies and workforce development. Our proven system is based on decades of cumulative experience as transgender leaders working to advance inclusion in the public, private and nonprofit sectors across the country.

LA trans choir
transchorusla.org
Trans Chorus of Los Angeles is America’s first trans-identified choir made up of transgender, non-binary, intersex, nonconforming, and gender fluid individuals. TCLA celebrates diversity and acceptance in our acceptance and vocal presentation so that others can see and feel the joy we share. Through our music, we bring the awareness, understanding, power and victory of the trans community to the world.

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Cal State Dominguez Hills student makes history as one of the oldest graduates with a double major – Daily Breeze https://indigodreams.net/cal-state-dominguez-hills-student-makes-history-as-one-of-the-oldest-graduates-with-a-double-major-daily-breeze/ Sat, 29 May 2021 15:00:11 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/cal-state-dominguez-hills-student-makes-history-as-one-of-the-oldest-graduates-with-a-double-major-daily-breeze/ It’s never too late to get an education, and a Cal State Dominguez Hills graduate set out to prove it. On the first day of the school’s opening ceremonies earlier this week, Maria Manning, a double major in Spanish Liberal Studies and Public Services, was among students in classes 2020 and 2021 to graduate at […]]]>

It’s never too late to get an education, and a Cal State Dominguez Hills graduate set out to prove it.

On the first day of the school’s opening ceremonies earlier this week, Maria Manning, a double major in Spanish Liberal Studies and Public Services, was among students in classes 2020 and 2021 to graduate at Dignity Health Sports Park. Manning did so at 88 – making her one of the oldest students in the Cal State University system to graduate with a double major.

But his road to success has seen many setbacks along the way.

Manning, originally from the Cape Verde Islands in West Africa, immigrated to America with his family at the age of 31.

Manning had wanted to study in his home country, his daughter, Christine Manning, said.

But after she married her husband, John Manning, and had a daughter, her education was put on the back burner.

“I wanted to earn my education,” Manning said. “But I had to take care of my family.”

And that’s what she did, raising her daughter and helping her with her own schooling.

Then, in the early 1990s, Manning enrolled in classes at Compton Adult School and eventually transferred to Compton College and then to CSUDH. She has also worked in many local schools in the Compton and Long Beach areas. But her husband then fell ill and she had her own health issues which brought her to the hospital.

His academic career was once again cut short.

Manning’s husband died in 2010.

Manning had dropped out of all her classes at CSUDH, discouraged by the setbacks. His hiatus lasted a dozen years.

Then she returned to work.

“I didn’t let that stop me,” she said of herself and her husband’s health issues. “My work was not going to go down the drain.”

And now she’s made her family proud – especially her daughter.

“It’s the most beautiful thing,” Christine Manning said. “I can’t even say how proud I am of her.

Her daughter, however, was not alone in her enthusiasm.

During his time at CSUDH, Manning became a popular figure among his peers – many of whom were much younger – and even among faculty.



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Kansas City families help Gaza student attend college in the United States https://indigodreams.net/kansas-city-families-help-gaza-student-attend-college-in-the-united-states/ Sat, 29 May 2021 00:40:00 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/kansas-city-families-help-gaza-student-attend-college-in-the-united-states/ BEFORE MOHAMMED CAMTOE KANSAS CITY. HE NEVER LEAVE GAZA AND WHEN I ARRIVED HE COULDN’T BELIEVE I WAS REALLY HERE. HE ATTENDED PEMBROKE HILLS AN EXCHANGE STUDENT IN 2017 SHARING THE YEAR BETWEEN TWO HOST FAMILIES MUHAMMAD IS THE CLOSEST THING I HAVE TO A BROTHER HIS HOST SISTER KATE MORTHINGTON GOT TO INTRODUCE HIM […]]]>

BEFORE MOHAMMED CAMTOE KANSAS CITY. HE NEVER LEAVE GAZA AND WHEN I ARRIVED HE COULDN’T BELIEVE I WAS REALLY HERE. HE ATTENDED PEMBROKE HILLS AN EXCHANGE STUDENT IN 2017 SHARING THE YEAR BETWEEN TWO HOST FAMILIES MUHAMMAD IS THE CLOSEST THING I HAVE TO A BROTHER HIS HOST SISTER KATE MORTHINGTON GOT TO INTRODUCE HIM IN THE STRUGGLE IN AMERICA WHEN HE IMMEDIATELY COME TO AMERICA ASPECT OF AMERICAN LIFE. SO EY KA PLAYED AT SOCCER. HE PLAYED BASKETBALL. HE BINGE WATCHED ALL SEASONS OF TNEE FRIENDS. NOW BACK IN GAZA.S. THE RECENT CONFLICT HAS BEEN RITGH OUTSIDE MUHAMMAD’S GATE THIS VIDEO SHOWS WHERE A BOMB HIT 150 FEET FROM HIS HOME. I didn’t know if I was gone to be alive in the next moment or not because it’s just H YEAH, THIS IS JUST AS DIFFICULT BEFORE THE Ceasefire. IUL FLY COULD NOT SLEEP THE IKI WOULD STAY. LATE AT NIGHT. JUST CRY AS HER HOST FAMILIES WORRY FOR HIS SAFETY ALL OVER THE WORLD. THEY ARE WORKING TO HELP HER FULFILL HIS DREAM OF ATTENDING CO LLEGE IN THE UNITED STATES ESTABLISHING A GOFUNDME TO HELP COVER THE COSTS COMING TO THE UNITED STATES MEANS A LOT OF BASIC OPPORTUNITIES AND A LOT OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR PEO, SURROUNDINGS. PLWHO ARE READY TO WORK HARD FOR THEM. IT’S JUSTO S RESILIENT. HE REALLY SHOWED ME THAT KE, AS YOU CAN DO EVERYTHING IF YOU PUT YOUR M

Kansas City families help Gaza student attend college in the United States

Mohammad Abuajwa was an exchange student at Pembroke Hill and hopes to return to the United States.

A teenager from Gaza who studied as an exchange student in Kansas City hopes to return to the United States for college. KMBC spoke to their host families in the metro about how they are helping to achieve this. Before Mohammad Abuajwa arrived in Kansas City, he had never left Gaza. “When I got there, I couldn’t believe I was really here,” he said via Zoom from his home in Gaza. He traveled to Kansas City as an exchange student in 2017 to attend Pembroke Hill for his freshman year. “It was a beautiful city, I liked everything,” he said. Mohammad divided his year between two host families, one of whom was student Kate Northington. “Mohammad is the closest thing I have to a brother,” she said. Northington was able to introduce him to life in America. “When he came, he wanted to immerse himself in every possible aspect of American life… he played football, he played basketball,” she said. “He’s overwatched 10 seasons are friends,” Northington said with a laugh. “We were very impressed with his work ethic,” said Carmen Blatter Pfluger, whose family also welcomed Mohammad. She said she learned as much from him as from his family. “It was good to share, it gives an understanding that you didn’t have before,” she said. “It’s good to have that perspective and it’s an open mind, it broadens the horizon.” Back in Gaza, the recent conflict unfolded right outside Mohammad’s doorstep. A video shared with KMBC 9 shows where a bomb hit 50 meters from his home. “It was scary,” he said. “I didn’t know if I was going to be alive in the next moment or not because it’s like that, it’s just how hard it was.” He added: “There were many nights when the bombing continued indefinitely.” “Before the ceasefire, I couldn’t sleep completely,” Northington said. “I was staying up late at night, just crying.” She added: “I think a lot of people, even people who knew Mohammed while he was here, think, ‘Oh, that’s kind of distant from us’ … it’s just very scary to ‘hear everything that’s going on there when it’s so close to it all. As Mohammad’s host families worry for his safety around the world, they work to help him realize his dream of going to college in the United States. “Coming to the United States means a lot of opportunities … especially for people who are willing to work hard for them,” Mohammad said. He was accepted to the University of Bridgewater in Virginia, and his host families at KC set up a GoFundMe to help cover the costs. “I know his hard work, he studied a lot and he deserves it,” said Blatter Pfluger. “He’s resilient,” Northington said. “He really showed me that you can do anything if you think about it.” Mohammad hopes to specialize in environmental studies or computer science. If you would like to donate on their GoFundMe page, click here.

A teenager from Gaza who studied as an exchange student in Kansas City hopes to return to the United States for college. KMBC spoke to their host families in the metro about how they are helping to achieve this.

Before Mohammad Abuajwa arrived in Kansas City, he had never left Gaza. “When I got there, I couldn’t believe I was really here,” he said via Zoom from his home in Gaza. He traveled to Kansas City as an exchange student in 2017 to attend Pembroke Hill for his freshman year. “It was a beautiful city, I liked everything,” he said.

Mohammad divided his year between two host families, one of whom was student Kate Northington. “Mohammad is the closest thing I have to a brother,” she said. Northington was able to introduce him to life in America. “When he came, he wanted to immerse himself in every possible aspect of American life… he played football, he played basketball,” she said. “He’s overwatched 10 seasons are friends,” Northington said with a laugh.

“We were very impressed with his work ethic,” said Carmen Blatter Pfluger, whose family also welcomed Mohammad. She said she learned as much from him as from his family. “It was good to share, it gives an understanding that you didn’t have before,” she said. “It’s good to have that perspective and it’s an open mind, it broadens the horizon.”

Back in Gaza, the recent conflict unfolded right outside Mohammad’s doorstep. A video shared with KMBC 9 shows where a bomb hit 50 meters from his home. “It was scary,” he said. “I didn’t know if I was going to be alive in the next moment or not because it’s like that, it’s just how hard it was.” He added: “There were many nights when the bombing continued indefinitely.”

“Before the ceasefire, I couldn’t sleep completely,” Northington said. “I was staying up late at night, just crying.” She added: “I think a lot of people, even people who knew Mohammed while he was here, think, ‘Oh, that’s kind of distant from us’ … it’s just very scary to ‘hear everything that’s going on there when it’s so close to it all.

As Mohammad’s host families worry for his safety around the world, they work to help him realize his dream of going to college in the United States. “Coming to the United States means a lot of opportunities … especially for people who are willing to work hard for them,” Mohammad said.

He was accepted to the University of Bridgewater in Virginia, and his host families at KC set up a GoFundMe to help cover the costs. “I know his hard work, he studied a lot and he deserves it,” said Blatter Pfluger.

“He’s resilient,” Northington said. “He really showed me that you can do anything if you think about it.”

Mohammad hopes to specialize in environmental studies or computer science. If you would like to donate on their GoFundMe page, click here.



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Documentary: Netflix’s Alma Matters helped deepen our cinematic obsession with IIT – Leisure News https://indigodreams.net/documentary-netflixs-alma-matters-helped-deepen-our-cinematic-obsession-with-iit-leisure-news/ Fri, 28 May 2021 11:57:59 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/documentary-netflixs-alma-matters-helped-deepen-our-cinematic-obsession-with-iit-leisure-news/ American filmmakers are inspired by the Ivy Leagues and high schools. In Hindi entertainment, however, most academic storylines begin and end with the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT). Many filmmakers have found their imaginations sparked by this Mecca of engineering studies. Rajkumar Hirani and Abhijat Joshi, for example, leafed through Chetan Bhagat’s bestseller Five Point […]]]>

American filmmakers are inspired by the Ivy Leagues and high schools. In Hindi entertainment, however, most academic storylines begin and end with the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT). Many filmmakers have found their imaginations sparked by this Mecca of engineering studies. Rajkumar Hirani and Abhijat Joshi, for example, leafed through Chetan Bhagat’s bestseller Five Point Someone for their denunciation of rote learning in 3 Idiots (2009), the first Hindi film to cross the Rs 200 crore mark. .

The year 2010 then saw a group of IIT alumni come together to create The Viral Fever (TVF), an online content platform that wowed audiences with sketches and series such as Kota Factory. , a show about the ITI aspirants’ misadventures in Coaching City. . Filmmaker Nitesh Tiwari revisited the IIT Bombay campus for the hit Chhichhore (2019), while IIT Kharagpur graduate Biswa Kalyan Rath focused on the stressful context of an IIT coaching institute in the first season of the popular Amazon Prime show Laakhon Mein Ek. On May 14, Netflix released a three-part documentary series Alma Matters: Inside the IIT Dream, which takes place in Kharagpur. Later this year, the OTT platform will launch the second season of Kota Factory.

So what about IIT which makes it a must have backdrop for creators? For Prashant Raj, co-director of Alma Matters and one of the co-founders of TVF, he represents “the Indian version of the American dream, the only place where the middle class has found hope and success. You take an exam and it changes the life of a family or a social system. While Raj emphasizes the importance of merit, it is, for others, an environment full of drama and fun. “It’s a place where you go through so many emotions – the stress, the pressure to compete with the cream of the nation,” says Sameer Saxena, also TVF co-founder and Kota Factory season one showrunner. . “It opens up the world to you and allows you to go out and explore the possibilities that are available to you.”

In the popular imagination, the IIT is the destination of choice for outposts, math and science geeks, but it is also a place where some of them have come to discover their passion for the arts. A former student of IIT Bombay, Saxena took up theater during her four years. Writer-director Nitesh Tiwari’s “Love Affair with Movies” began with four monthly screenings held at the auditorium of Mumbai’s Powai campus. “The first Hollywood movie I saw on the big screen – Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade – was here,” recalls Tiwari, whose pursuit of theater and sports didn’t hurt his score – an impressive CPI of 7.34 (cumulative performance index). Actor Amol Parashar, best known for playing Chitvan on TVF’s Tripling, was drawn to “a strong culture of experimentation and rigor” at the Dramatics Club at IIT Delhi while studying mechanical engineering. “These four years are an integral part of who I am and therefore have an influence on the artist that I am,” he says.

Raj is of a similar mold. Delhi, he recalls, was his first choice given its location: “Ek PVR side [Cinemas], ek LSR side [College]. But Raj would end up staying in the Kharagpur cocoon for six years, studying B. Tech and pursuing a master’s degree in mining. Twelve years later, during an uncertain period in his professional life, he accompanies his friend on a trip to campus. His Eureka moment came when he saw four boys in his hostel room playing card game 29. He decided to make a documentary that would focus on students like him, “who are in the middle of the bell curve. – the average, impostors who think they are lucky to be there, ”he said. Being an alumnus made it easier to get permission to shoot. “I would say there was a level of confidence,” Raj says. “I had made it clear at the start that I would tell my campus story, which might be different from their perspective.” IIT stories will never get old, Saxena believes, as long as they are told from different angles to make them engaging. “These experiences will stay with us for a long time,” he says.

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