Financial Nightmares – Indigo Dreams http://indigodreams.net/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 11:19:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://indigodreams.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1.png Financial Nightmares – Indigo Dreams http://indigodreams.net/ 32 32 Pakistan’s economic conundrum https://indigodreams.net/pakistans-economic-conundrum/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 07:01:28 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/pakistans-economic-conundrum/ The raging popularity of virtual currencies is hardly unknown these days. Apart from the overwhelming crackdown in China, fluctuations in the price of cryptocurrencies – especially bitcoin – are definitely seen as perpetual and inherent: they are unlikely to go away. And while volatility brings a unique thrill to retail investors, seasoned experts in the […]]]>

The raging popularity of virtual currencies is hardly unknown these days. Apart from the overwhelming crackdown in China, fluctuations in the price of cryptocurrencies – especially bitcoin – are definitely seen as perpetual and inherent: they are unlikely to go away. And while volatility brings a unique thrill to retail investors, seasoned experts in the financial world are likely skeptical. Regardless of the apparent discomfort and resistance to tapping into the pool of virtual currencies, policymakers around the world are aware that the future is digital. Therefore, while digital fiat appears to be the direction of most developed economies to counter decentralized giants, economics gurus are also preparing to exploit mania on another front – before the craze surpasses the world.

The first – and most popular – cryptocurrency is undoubtedly bitcoin. In the aftermath of the Chinese crackdown on mining activities, bitcoin lost more than half of its valuation. However, acceptance around the world over the past few weeks has helped the currency weather the crisis. Bitcoin currently sits at a market cap of $ 863.8 billion: flirting with the $ 46,000 mark. Naturally, the rest of the crypto world is moving in tandem as fanatics have bet for the currency to once again cross the psychological $ 50,000 mark in the following months. However, the rally is largely attributed to the flourishing acceptance of governments around the world; something that officials were wary of to avoid risk and uncertainty. However, I still don’t understand the change in perception as the market is more volatile than ever.

The headlines last week were about El Salvador and its adoption of bitcoin as legal tender. The fiasco that followed was hardly a surprise. While the incident bolstered criticism of the crypto, the event did not project any mystery ahead of the launch. A problem in the virtual wallet, called “Chivo Wallet”, was one of the myriad obstacles that had already been deemed risky by economists around the world. While the issue was resolved within hours, the price of bitcoin plunged 19% from a 4-month high of $ 53,000. President Nayib Bukele boasted of “Buy at the bottom of the wave” yet overlooked a crucial aspect from a broader perspective. He didn’t realize that a small problem in his small nation was big enough to cause the currency to skyrocket; in just a few hours, billions of dollars were wiped off the global market. All because the app could not appear on the designated platforms for a few hours.

What happened in El Salvador is an essential example to analyze. The resulting confusion is exactly why a settlement passage is placed. If domestic and international markets are to rely on cryptocurrencies in the near future, then the need for a detailed framework becomes even more magnified.

Recently, Ukraine became the fifth country in a matter of weeks to legalize bitcoin. However, as the Ukrainian parliament passed a bill to legalize cryptocurrency, regulations are being put in place to deal with its precarious and volatile nature. Unlike El Salvador’s cowardly move, Ukraine has not made it easy to roll out bitcoin as a form of payment. In addition, parliament refrained from placing bitcoin on an equal footing with the hryvnia, Ukraine’s national currency. Mainly because adding another currency subject to unprecedented and wild fluctuations in value could prove to be complex in terms of policy making, including drafting tax budgets and tax planning. And while Kiev is pushing to lean more into bitcoin to gain more access to global investment, authorities are cautious. Therefore, unlike El Salvador’s brazen entry, Ukrainian authorities are putting forward a strategy to learn more about the crypto world before bitcoin is forever etched into Ukrainian law.

Meanwhile, the United States is getting rather strict on the rise of bitcoin – and the crypto world – as nightmares of another financial crisis hamper gradual adoption. Lawmakers are already vigilant to bring braces to the market before it blossoms out of control. The recently passed Senate Infrastructure Bill provides insight into the direction taken by U.S. lawmakers. The tax provision, estimated at $ 28 billion over a decade, has been placed as a regulation of the crypto market that stands at a valuation of $ 2,000 billion. The Treasury guidelines aim to mobilize the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to tax crypto brokers while monitoring mandatory reporting requirements. The goal is obvious: gradually tighten the screws before regulating uncharted territory like any other capital market. However, the bill is intentionally vague with regard to market participants considered to be brokers under the new law. Naturally, frenzy ensues as miners scramble to define the meaning of a broker in an extremely complex and unorthodox market mechanism. It is clear that prominent lawmakers, like Senator Elizabeth Warren, are the main driving forces behind bringing the leash to the emerging market.

In addition, the United States Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) has commented on the long-awaited intervention of the Treasury in the crypto market. Virtual currencies have reportedly emerged as a key tool for tax evasion in the United States. Therefore, much of the lobbying to change the tax provision of the infrastructure bill is aimed at limiting the rigor of enforcement rather than simplifying vague terminologies. Additionally, the Treasury Department has also been active in discussions about the financial stability of Stablecoin – crypto assets indexed to the U.S. dollar and other fiat currencies. While extreme volatility is not a risk in this scenario, federal agencies – in particular the Financial Stability Supervisory Board (FSOC) – have been keen to impose tighter regulations on the market with more than $ 120 billion. dollars in circulation. The movement has been swift since the tax provision made its way into Senate debate. The main intention of regulating stablecoin – particularly Tether – is to mine the market, primarily because the sector acts as an unregulated money market mutual fund holding huge amounts of corporate debt. A fall in prices is enough to trigger a turmoil in the fixed income markets, posing a financial threat to the entire market. Thus, the FSOC should soon be mobilized to probe and regulate the market as it continues to grow.

The crypto world has been cited by global lenders such as the IMF as a haven for money laundering and tax evasion. Such markers could lead to negative credit scores and ineligibility to secure investments and aid programs, especially when debt-ridden countries like El Salvador manage without any fixed legal framework. However, with broader regulation, such as measures taken by the United States and Ukraine, the risk could be minimized. Another area is to initiate with experienced investors before gradually easing market restrictions for retail investors. A prime example is Germany which recently allowed institutional investors to invest up to 20% of their holdings in bitcoin and other crypto-assets. While this portion still totals billions of dollars, these skillful institutional investors are sufficiently trained to manage and oversee trillions of dollars in a wide variety of capital markets. In addition, these large institutional investment firms are already subject to strict regulatory requirements and, by default, are therefore required to consciously maintain cautious positions.

In my opinion, the crypto market is the financial future of the technological utopia that we aspire to build. The smart choice, therefore, is to learn the system down to its spine. Correct gaps and irregularities while monitoring experienced professionals participating in a free market. Outline and modify legal aspects and a financial framework along the way. And gradually let the market settle in like second nature.


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11 on-screen villains we hate so much that only proves these actors did a fantastic job https://indigodreams.net/11-on-screen-villains-we-hate-so-much-that-only-proves-these-actors-did-a-fantastic-job/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 08:04:13 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/11-on-screen-villains-we-hate-so-much-that-only-proves-these-actors-did-a-fantastic-job/ You fell in love with Ganesh Gaitonde even when it was a villainous role. You also fell in love with the thieves of Money theft even when they looted the banks. We also fell in love with Walter White from breaking Bad even after he became the hub of Heisenberg meth, and we loved Ranveer […]]]>

You fell in love with Ganesh Gaitonde even when it was a villainous role. You also fell in love with the thieves of Money theft even when they looted the banks. We also fell in love with Walter White from breaking Bad even after he became the hub of Heisenberg meth, and we loved Ranveer Singh’s impeccable performance as Khilji in Padmaavat and Munna Tripathi from Divyendu Sharma in Mirzapur.

There are villains we fall strangely in love with, and then there are others whose deaths and downfall we celebrate. Here is a list of the most hated villains that only prove that these actors did a fantastic job.

1. Gus Fring in Breaking Bad (Giancarlo Esposito)

Youtube

On several occasions, Gus Fring tried to act like a rational man, but he was just as bad as the Cartel or even more. He spoke with the utmost eloquence and poise as if he was a motivational speaker, but what he said was terrifying. For example, “If you try to intervene, it becomes much easier. I will kill your wife. I will kill your son. I will kill your little girl.

2. Ramsay Bolton in Game of Thrones (Iwan Rheon)

Ramsay Bolton in Game of Thrones (Iwan Rheon) - Most Hated Villains
HBO

There were several others we hated in Game Of Thrones like Euron Greyjoy, Lysa Arryn, Joffrey Baratheon, but the one character everyone hated with equal intensity was Ramsay Bolton. He tortured, raped and killed people just for his own pleasure. He was so bad that people felt bad for Theon Greyjoy when he tortured him. How he treated Sansa remains controversial to this day.

3. Gandia in Money Heist (José Manuel Poga)

Gandia in Money Heist (José Manuel Poga) - Most Hated Villains
Netflix

Arturo may be the most boring character on the show, but Gandia is the one people hate the most. The Bank of Spain’s security chief is on the right side, but he’s an antagonist in Money Heist. After all, he shot Nairobi without any hesitation. His taunts are harsh and he could kill in the blink of an eye. He often showed signs of a bad psychopath.

4. Bob Biswas in Kahaani (Saswata Chatterjee)

Bob Biswas in Kahaani (Saswata Chatterjee) - Most Hated Villains
Twitter

Played by Saswata Chatterjee, Bob Biswas is a psychopath. He’s not a quintessential villain like Gabbar, Shakaal, or Mogambo who had mean laughs and evil expressions. He’s an ordinary man with a belly who can disappear into a crowd. Yet it leaves an impact like no other.

5. Sunny in Mardaani 2 (Vishal Jethwa)

Sunny in Mardaani 2 (Vishal Jethwa) - Most Hated Villains
Youtube

Killer rapist Sunny in Mardaani 2 sent shivers down people’s spines. His powerful performance as the feared villain was also the TV actor’s Bollywood debut. This earned him applause from critics as well as viewers.

6. Dheeraj Pandey in Murder 2 (Prashant Narayanan)

Dheeraj Pandey in Murder 2 (Prashant Narayanan) - Most Hated Villains
Twitter

Prashant Narayanan gave the best performance of his career as Dheeraj Pandey in Murder 2. Dheeraj was a cross-dressing misogynist eunuch who called prostitutes and murdered them. He was a psychopathic serial killer who pretended to be a client, then tortured his victims to death.

7. Dresser in Gladiator (Joaquin Phoenix)

Dresser in Gladiator (Joaquin Phoenix) - Most Hated Villains
Twitter

Even after so many years, it is difficult for us to dissociate Joaquin Phoenix from his role as Commodus. This is the impact he left on us all. While most of us hate him deeply for the role, we also agree that he deserved an Oscar for this wonderful performance.

8. Calvin Candie in Django Unchained (Leonardo DiCaprio)

Leonardo DiCaprio in Django Unchained
Youtube

Not just the fans, even Leonardo DiCaprio believes Calvin Candie is “one of the most deplorable, forgiving, and horrible characters” he has ever met. After all, he was pitting slaves against each other in fight to the death just so he could take advantage.

9. Warden Norton in Shawshank Redemption (Bob Gunton)

Warden Norton in Shawshank Redemption (Bob Gunton) - Most Hated Villains
Twitter

We saw a lot of corrupt prison guards, but Warden Samuel Norton was the worst. He was not only a hypocrite who preached the Bible to prisoners, but also used his position of power for his own financial gain. Not only that, he even killed to cover up his crimes.

10. Lajja Shankar Pandey in Sangharsh (Ashutosh Rana)

Lajja Shankar Pandey in Sangharsh (Ashutosh Rana) - Most Hated Villains
Twitter

Ashutosh Rana’s spooky portrayal of Lajja Shankar Pandey in Sangharsh terrified us all. Her role gave us nightmares when we were kids. His villainous character was no larger than life which seemed fictional, but he was close to a character we see in our day to day life.

11. Jageera at the gate of China (Mukesh Tiwari)

Jageera at China Gate (Mukesh Tiwari) - Most Hated Villains
Twitter

As a child, Jageera from China Gate gave us shivers. He would give human flesh to the vultures. Her filthy hair and makeup was scary too. Interestingly, he played comic book characters like Vasuli Bhai afterwards. He has indeed proven his talent as an actor.


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Guitars for Vets, a Kenosha nonprofit, rocks the Summerfest scene https://indigodreams.net/guitars-for-vets-a-kenosha-nonprofit-rocks-the-summerfest-scene/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 22:39:00 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/guitars-for-vets-a-kenosha-nonprofit-rocks-the-summerfest-scene/ MILWAUKEE – On Military Appreciation Day at Summerfest, some veterans took to the Generac stage to play a two-hour set. The artists were all part of the nonprofit Guitars for Vets. It is a Kenosha-based organization that offers free guitars and lessons to veterans as a form of therapy. “The guitar resonates at the center […]]]>

MILWAUKEE – On Military Appreciation Day at Summerfest, some veterans took to the Generac stage to play a two-hour set.

The artists were all part of the nonprofit Guitars for Vets. It is a Kenosha-based organization that offers free guitars and lessons to veterans as a form of therapy.

“The guitar resonates at the center of your being, and it’s very calming,” said Patrick Nettesheim, co-founder of Guitars for Vets.

Nettesheim is not a veteran, but believes that giving veterans this form of therapy is important in creating “world peace”.

“And we’re going to give them a voice. A voice that doesn’t need to be spoken. The one that can be created through that of the guitar.

So far 6,000 veterans have participated in the program. Some of them were playing alongside Nettesheim during that two-hour Summerfest set.

“You see a lot of terrible things and terrible nightmares, so you try to put them away,” said Pet Ruzicka, president of Guitars for Vets.

Ruzicka performed on stage and said it was a wonderful experience. He spent 24 years in the military working in Grenada, Germany, Iraq. For him, and for many others, this program has helped him cope and talk about his experiences.

“And then you start the camaraderie that you develop with others. They are trying to learn or do the same, ”Ruzicka said.

Being able to play Summerfest was just the icing on the cake. Guitars for Vets currently has around 5,000 applicants awaiting a guitar and a lesson. Patrick Nettesheim hopes performances like these can help raise awareness and give more veterans the therapeutic tools they need.

Guitars for Vets takes both financial donations and guitar donations. So if you have a guitar in the house that isn’t played and you want to donate it, head over to their website to find out more.

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Adam Taliaferro 20 years after returning to Beaver Stadium – Delco Times https://indigodreams.net/adam-taliaferro-20-years-after-returning-to-beaver-stadium-delco-times/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 00:22:02 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/adam-taliaferro-20-years-after-returning-to-beaver-stadium-delco-times/ Wayne Sebastianelli has been with Adam Taliaferro since the moment he awkwardly fell onto the Ohio stadium field and was unable to get up. The Penn State football doctor stayed with Taliaferro in Columbus until his father arrived the next day. He often visited him in the Magee Rehabilitation Hospital, when he could no longer […]]]>

Wayne Sebastianelli has been with Adam Taliaferro since the moment he awkwardly fell onto the Ohio stadium field and was unable to get up. The Penn State football doctor stayed with Taliaferro in Columbus until his father arrived the next day. He often visited him in the Magee Rehabilitation Hospital, when he could no longer move his arms and legs, and then after he began a miraculous recovery.

So Sebastianelli was a little worried nearly a year later when Taliaferro warned him of what could happen on the night of September 1, 2001.

“I remember he had done something stupid a few days before that night and said he was going to get out of the tunnel and go out onto the pitch,” Sebastianelli recalls. “He would drop by the office from time to time and tell us. I would say, ‘Be careful.’ He was just going to do it.

Less than 12 months after sustaining a serious spinal cord injury, Taliaferro wowed the record crowd of 109,313 at Beaver Stadium when he led the Nittany Lions to the field for their opener against Miami, Fla. .

That night 20 years ago, he wore his blue No.43 jersey, waved to raving crowds as he waited to be introduced, walked the field with a jump, jump and jog.

“I remember it like it was yesterday,” said Taliaferro. “We were in the locker room and I felt like I was a player again. I had that nervous feeling that I had before every game. Doc Sebastianelli came to my locker and asked me if I was okay.

“He said, ‘Adam, whatever you do, people are going to like it.’ I went there and this peace has just come over me.

It was very different from what the first-year cornerback felt on September 23, 2000. He tackled Ohio State running back Jerry Westbrooks late in a lopsided loss, then tried to use his arms. to get up but could not. He tried to stand up, but his legs were not working. He couldn’t his ends.

“The idea of ​​being paralyzed never occurred to me,” he said. “I remember Bhawoh Jue, our other corner, saying, ‘Adam, come on, get up!’ I remember he leaned towards me and I started to panic because I couldn’t move anything. I remember looking up and seeing Doc Sebastianelli and Coach (Joe) Paterno. Over time, I started to panic. I remember telling Doc, “I can’t move! I can not move !’ From that point on, it got a bit hazy.

Sebastianelli and other medical staff put him on a stretcher. Ohio State orthopedic surgeon Dr. Chris Kaeding helped stabilize Taliaferro. The next day, Dr. Gary Rea performed a two-hour spinal fusion surgery at the Ohio State Medical Center.

After four days, Taliaferro was flown to Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, near his home in Voorhees, NJ. He was transferred in early October to the Magee Rehabilitation Center.

“About four or five days after I started my stay in Magee, my dad (André) rolled me up to the roof so I could get some fresh air,” he said. “Two guys were playing basketball and I broke down. It was the first time that I knew I was disabled. I realized I was broken. My body was no longer functioning.
“It was the first time I cried. My dad said, ‘Take it all out. We were waiting for you to have this moment. It was probably one of my lowest points.

Penn State graduate Adam Taliaferro during a visit to the PSE & G Children’s Specialty Hospital in New Brunswick, NJ in 2014. Taliaferro, who feared he would be paralyzed after a spinal cord injury suffered in 2000 while ‘he played for Penn State, became a disability rights advocate and member of the New Jersey Assembly. (AP Photo / Mel Evans, file)

He was told he has a 3% chance of walking again. About three weeks later, however, a turning point came: after his parents returned home one night, one of his nurses noticed he was moving a toe.

“She asked me to do it again, and I did it,” Taliaferro recalls. “It was around 10:30 or 11 at night and she called my dad. He went back to see for himself. We had a celebration in the hospital room that night. He called coach Paterno and some of my teammates to finally give them some good news. It was probably one of the best times of my life.

Andre also called Sebastianelli after 1 a.m. and shouted the news to him.

“I still get chills when I think of that call,” Sebastianelli said. “I knew then that he was going to be able to walk. He was the miracle. He just took off after that. It was dazzling. “

Taliaferro emerged from Magee on crutches in January 2001. He received outpatient therapy there for four hours a day until April and returned to Penn State as a student in May. He always expected to play football again. It was until preseason camp in 2002.

“I was sitting in the locker room and the guys were putting on their shoulder pads and helmets,” he said. “I felt like I was going to cry. It struck me that I would not be playing anymore. Then I thought back to Magee’s patients who had difficulty walking and breathing on their own.
“I was like, ‘What the hell are you thinking about? I never thought about it again. I have always thought about how lucky, blessed and lucky I am.

Tom Bradley, who became Penn State’s defensive coordinator in 2000, said Taliaferro would have had a great career. The three-sport athlete at Eastern High was an all-state first-team selection in attack and defense. He was widely regarded as one of the best high school players in South Jersey history.

“He was the best young defensive back I have ever coached,” said Bradley, who was on the staff at Penn State from 1979 to 2011. “He had great skills. He could do anything. He was tough. He was smart. He understood the game. He was coachable. He was just an exceptional talent.

Taliaferro was a student assistant coach, graduated from Penn State, and received his law degree from Rutgers-Camden. He joined Bristol-Myers Squibb as a health care advocate and became a politician, running for a fourth term as a member of the New Jersey Assembly. The Adam Taliaferro Foundation provides emotional, financial and educational support to victims of catastrophic spinal cord injury and their families, and he often visits Magee’s patients, hoping to give hope to others he has. found there.

Now 39, he is married to Erin (Mulshenock), a former Penn State swimmer. They have two children, Cruz, 6, and Chloé, 3.

So much would not have happened without the injury.

“Of course I can be bitter not to play football, but it really taught me to discover myself,” said Taliaferro. “I really thought I was just a soccer player and that’s all I could do. The injury was horrific, but the life lessons I learned were invaluable. “

Sebastianelli is not surprised by what Taliaferro has accomplished. He said he had nightmares “for a long time” about that afternoon in Columbus in 2000. Almost a year later, Taliaferro took a walk to Beaver Stadium that will be remembered forever.

“I was on the sidelines and I could see the tunnel,” Sebastianelli said. “I saw Adam come out. As soon as the crowd saw it, it was just over. I had tears running down my face. There was a referee next to me and he asked me if I was okay. “I have never felt better. “

“I’ve been doing this for 40 years and you just don’t see it. You don’t get this special gift very often. It was one of them. It was really special.


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Has the pandemic made your child anxious? Here is what to do https://indigodreams.net/has-the-pandemic-made-your-child-anxious-here-is-what-to-do/ Sun, 05 Sep 2021 01:31:49 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/has-the-pandemic-made-your-child-anxious-here-is-what-to-do/ ML, seven, was always shy, but never sad or moody. The class II student, who lives in Gurugram, Haryana, and is part of a large common family, was attentive in class, polite with his acquaintances and happy in the company of his friends and family. That all changed this summer, when the devastating second wave […]]]>

ML, seven, was always shy, but never sad or moody. The class II student, who lives in Gurugram, Haryana, and is part of a large common family, was attentive in class, polite with his acquaintances and happy in the company of his friends and family. That all changed this summer, when the devastating second wave of covid-19 engulfed the country.

His paternal uncle, one of his usual playmates, had to be hospitalized at the end of May. He recovered but within weeks of the diagnosis ML retreated into a shell. He would be distracted in class and extremely quiet at home. Periods of quiet were interspersed with irritability when asked to finish homework or a task. His mother, a teacher, found him awake at night, unable to sleep. In July, he started asking for the lights to be on at night. “I still remember the first night he mentioned he was scared in the dark. That’s when I decided to see a counselor, ”she says.

In counseling sessions, he was asked to draw a picture of how he was feeling. The drawings were filled with grays, blacks and browns, with just the lonely figure of a child in an empty house. “It was then that we realized how much the uncertainty of the situation affected him,” says his mother.

ML is not alone. According to an article published Aug. 9 by the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota in the United States, anxiety rates in children around the world may have risen sharply since the start of the pandemic. (This is) according to the results of a meta-literature review published in JAMA Pediatrics. Researchers looked at 29 general population studies, one of which was not peer-reviewed, and found combined depression and anxiety rate at 25.2% and 20.5%, respectively. Researchers write that the sharp increase was associated with later stages of the pandemic. Until the pandemic, anxiety rates were estimated at 11.6%.

According to the study, one in five children report anxiety. The reasons are multiple: social isolation, loss, financial stressors, disruption and, most importantly, a radical change in routine.

Read also | How Subhadra Sengupta made the story fun and cool for kids

Usually, childhood is a time of exciting new experiences that help toddlers progress towards independence of thought and action. This happens with incidents big and small, like going to school on the bus, making friends, working in a team. The pandemic has turned all of this upside down, resulting in increased dependence on parents.

The assurance of a regular schedule has disappeared. Not all homes are comforting spaces, with children being abused or witnessing acrimony between family members. More screen time, often unattended, also makes children vulnerable to cybercriminals.

“I would change the word to emotional hardship. For small children, we don’t have the usual tests but projective techniques by which you can determine if a child is going through an emotional problem. I wouldn’t want to identify it and label it just as depression, but I can call it an emotional difficulty, ”says Khushnaaz Noras, a consultant psychologist based in Mumbai.

In young children, up to the age of seven to eight, parents should watch out for symptoms such as decreased food intake, low self-esteem, and withdrawal from activities they might have. may have liked to do otherwise. Be careful if any of the annoying or peculiar behaviors are magnified. In an already shy child, shyness can be amplified by fears related to the pandemic. “I also see many children becoming very distracted. Sometimes parents think this is normal, especially in these unprecedented times. However, it could be a marker of emotional difficulties, ”she said.

Ruchita Dar Shah, founder of the global community for mothers, First Moms Club, has seen messages, often anonymous, from parents about changes in their children’s behavior during the pandemic. There are concerns about mood swings or children snapping when asked a question. Some refuse to go out and play, even when offered a safe environment to do so. “This is reported in all age groups, not just among adolescents, but also among younger people,” she says.

Read also | Welcome to the Classrooms and Schools of the Covid Era in India

For children with pre-existing health conditions, the pandemic has brought new challenges. “We are seeing a relapse or worsening of these problems due to the stress caused by the pandemic”, explains K. John Vijay Sagar, professor and head of the department of child and adolescent psychiatry, National Institute of Health mental and neuroscience (Nimhans), Bengaluru.

According to the study How is the COVID-19 pandemic affecting the mental health of children and adolescents?, published in September 2020 in the PubMed Central repository of the National Library of Medicine of the United States National Institutes of Health, children with neurodevelopmental disorders, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and the condition of the autism spectrum (AUC), could fight against the lack of structure and routine during the pandemic. This, in turn, can have an impact on mental health. “In fact, an original study measured children’s ADHD behaviors during the covid-19 epidemic and found them to be worse than their normal state, showing increased irritability and more challenging behaviors,” the study says. .

Radhika Nair, a Mumbai-based clinical psychologist, says anxiety or emotional difficulties don’t just reflect sadness. In very young children, whether or not they have a neurodevelopmental disorder, this also manifests as anger. “There is this emotional discomfort and the children don’t have the words to express it. If your child’s behavior has changed – eating very little or a lot, isolating himself, crying over something that may seem trivial to adults, and sleeping a lot – you need to take note. This happens because they are too suffocated and overwhelmed with emotions, ”she explains. Another indicator of stress can be changes in sleep patterns.

Nair recounts cases involving a friend’s eight-year-old son. After absorbing the panic around covid-19, he refused to go out into the apartment complex and began to have nightmares. His mother tried to talk to him but he could not express his feelings. Nair asked him to draw what he was feeling. The child drew elaborate visuals on school closings and changes in his routine. These helped her mother understand her fears. “He was not depressed but had a lot of fear and anxiety. The use of play and drawing is therapeutic and useful in a situation where children do not have words to express what they are feeling, ”says Nair.

Read also | Who Said Motherhood Needs A Rulebook?

Updates on the number of covid-related deaths have been a major trigger. Children now feel stressed about everything they consume in newspapers and TV stations. “Do you think the Taliban will come to India? A nine year old girl asked me, a friend of my daughter. “Isn’t covid-19 enough of a problem in the world?” Why are people fighting? “

Dr Vijay Sagar says children in the seven to nine year old age group can have a lot of questions and, if not given the correct answer, can become fearful and withdrawn. “Very young children, up to the age of six, can begin to hold on to their parents. When the fear or anxiety becomes severe, one will notice a lingering sadness around some children. Even preschoolers are stressed. Sometimes you will find older children expressing death wishes, ”he explains.

Since the children are locked in the house, “they don’t even have the chance to think for themselves. At school, on occasions such as Independence Day, children can play or recite something. If they forget something, the teacher gives them plenty of time to remember it. But now, with online classes, they only look at parents for reminders, ”says Noras. This leads to a decrease in self-esteem. They keep asking themselves: am I able to do this, or am I okay just because my mom and dad are there?

Noras is currently working with a five-year-old who has a learning disability. “Earlier he was saying ‘my teacher did this, my friend did that.’ But now that he’s at home, there’s no one to blame for the hardships. So he turned the emotions inward and thinks the learning difficulty is his fault, ”she says. He has started daydreaming, so much so that he does not answer even when his parents call him. “He sank into his own shell. It can be thought of as a veiled depression, ”says Noras. “When it comes to emotional difficulties, parents need to be a bit vigilant about what’s going on in the house,” she advises. Most of the problems are due to environmental factors in the house and fights between people. “If you see behavioral changes that persist beyond a few weeks, seek professional help. “

Read also | If the anxiety is in the mind and body, what can be done about it?


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Find stress relief https://indigodreams.net/find-stress-relief/ Sun, 29 Aug 2021 05:19:44 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/find-stress-relief/ •Divorced• The death of a loved one. • Serious illness – stroke, paralysis amputation.• Serious accidents.• Crimes.• Fear of being kidnapped or killed by terrorists or bandits.• A hectic pace of life.• Disasters – natural or man-made. • Pressure at school or in the workplace. • Concerns about employment and financial security.• Retirement without tips, […]]]>

•Divorced
• The death of a loved one. • Serious illness – stroke, paralysis amputation.
• Serious accidents.
• Crimes.
• Fear of being kidnapped or killed by terrorists or bandits.
• A hectic pace of life.
• Disasters – natural or man-made. • Pressure at school or in the workplace. • Concerns about employment and financial security.
• Retirement without tips, pensions, personal house or vehicle. • Death of a spouse.

Losing a job can be devastating, putting the unemployed at risk of physical illness, marital strain, anxiety, depression and even suicide. Job loss affects all aspects of life.

It is not uncommon for children to suffer from stress. Some are bullied at school or neglected at home. Others are physically, emotionally or sexually abused. Many are worried about exams and grades. Still others see their families torn apart by divorce and separation. Stressed children may have nightmares, learning difficulties, depression, or a tendency to withdraw into themselves. Some people seem unable to control their emotions and suffer from panic attacks. A child who suffers from stress needs urgent help.

As I said ad nauseam, stress is your body’s response to a demanding situation. Your brain causes hormones to flood your system. These increase your heart rate, regulate your blood pressure, increase or contract the capacity of your lungs, and contract your muscles. Before you are fully aware of what is going on, your body is ready for action. When a stressful episode is over, your body is on high alert and returns to normal.

Next week we will discuss “good and bad stress and how to find stress relief”. Always be medically guided.

• Please follow me on [email protected]_ DRSUN.


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Making sense of dollar stores | Marion County File https://indigodreams.net/making-sense-of-dollar-stores-marion-county-file/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 20:35:11 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/making-sense-of-dollar-stores-marion-county-file/ Give sense out of dollar stores Of the many errors in judgment in handling a new dollar store project, the worst for Marion City Council was its failure on Monday to protect – or even discuss the need to protect – the city from damage. potentials that she probably will. Forget about the city’s past […]]]>

Give sense
out of dollar stores

Of the many errors in judgment in handling a new dollar store project, the worst for Marion City Council was its failure on Monday to protect – or even discuss the need to protect – the city from damage. potentials that she probably will.

Forget about the city’s past promises, binding or not, about competing stores. Forget if the city needs more such stores. Forget about the drainage nightmares that can arise. Forget if neighboring residences expect and deserve a buffer, and the streets in the area weren’t designed for commercial traffic.

The city was not allowed to sell the land it had decided to sell. Still, he promised that there would either be no problem or that he would pay all the expenses incurred by the developer.

It is not just an opinion that we have expressed. That’s what an attorney for the Kansas League of Municipalities told council member Ruth Herbel on Monday. Still, his plea to get council to face the facts and discuss how to protect the city fell on deaf ears with Mayor David Mayfield and council member Chris Costello, who used a vote. tied for both putting their heads in the sand and turning their backs on it as they always have in recent months.

When it opened in 2001, the Marion Industrial Park set aside the land in question, not only for drainage and easements, but also for landscaping and open space. It was designed to hide the entire development of an adjacent neighborhood and to serve as a bookend for Ann’s Park on the other side of Roosevelt St.

The same dedication, not modified since its initial filing in 2001, indicates that the area is not the property of the city but “must rather be owned and maintained by an association of owners which will be formed in the addition of the industrial park of Batt ”.

No such group appears to have been formed, but that does not mean that ownership automatically reverts to the city.

Kansas law clearly states that land reserved in a subdivision cannot be titled. While flattening and re-subdividing can change the status of the land, the city code makes it clear that the land cannot be sold in anticipation of a re-subdivision. Buyers and sellers must wait until the new subdivision is formally approved.

The only body that has a voice in the re-subdivision is not the council, but the city’s completely separate quasi-judicial zoning council, whose chairman declined a request from city administrator Roger Holter to approve the project and avoid discussion by the full board. This is yet another relevant fact, like the potential challenge of selling Dollar General, which Mayfield and Holter never shared with city council members before they voted to sell the land.

The more the situation escalates and the more persuaded the potential buyer is to start preparing to take over the site, the more the potential buyer will spend. And all of these costs could eventually become the responsibility of the city.

After being falsely told they had 120 days to change their mind, city council members rushed to sign a contract that includes a provision that could hold the city responsible for the money spent by the buyer if the deal fails.

It is not clear exactly who is responsible for all of this. Mayfield couldn’t even remember Monday if he had signed the contract. He was reminded that he had done so. Costello kept insisting that it was not yet a contract because a signed version has not yet been returned by the buyer. That’s true, but it’s kind of like saying you shouldn’t get out of the way of a falling object because it hasn’t hit you yet.

What the board should have done on Monday is notify the buyer that the issues need to be resolved, offer them extra time to opt out, and in return, ask the buyer to remove the liability. of the city for all costs incurred as a result of these problems.

Not only would this protect the interests of the city. It would also protect the buyer. And that has the added benefit of being the right thing to do.

This may not be the motto of some members of the municipal government, but when all else fails, try honesty and openness.

Failure to do so not only puts the city at risk. He’s also intimidating the planning commission into finding a way to approve a plan they don’t want just so the city doesn’t face financial liability. If this has been the real intention from the start, the city could have far more problems to deal with than that.

– ERIC MEYER


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Remarks on the situation in Yemen by UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore at the 8840th meeting of the United Nations Security Council https://indigodreams.net/remarks-on-the-situation-in-yemen-by-unicef-executive-director-henrietta-fore-at-the-8840th-meeting-of-the-united-nations-security-council/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 16:45:58 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/remarks-on-the-situation-in-yemen-by-unicef-executive-director-henrietta-fore-at-the-8840th-meeting-of-the-united-nations-security-council/ NEW YORK, August 23, 2021 – “Over six years ago, adults started a war in Yemen. They did so when they knew the terrible toll that violent conflict takes on children. “The war in Yemen, now in its seventh year, has created the world’s largest humanitarian crisis – a crisis compounded by the health and […]]]>

NEW YORK, August 23, 2021 – “Over six years ago, adults started a war in Yemen. They did so when they knew the terrible toll that violent conflict takes on children.

“The war in Yemen, now in its seventh year, has created the world’s largest humanitarian crisis – a crisis compounded by the health and socio-economic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Since I last spoke to you about Yemen two years ago in the Security Council Chamber, little has changed for the country’s civilian population. Every day, violence and destruction wreak havoc on the lives of children and their families. displacement, with 1.6 million children now internally displaced as a result of violence, particularly around Hudaydah and Marib.

“Basic services like healthcare, sanitation and education – all of which are vital for the humanitarian response – are incredibly fragile and on the brink of total collapse.

“The widespread lack of access to safe and sufficient water is of the utmost concern. Internally displaced people are particularly vulnerable to ongoing water cuts on the front lines.

“Meanwhile, Yemen’s economy is in a terrible state. GDP has fallen by 40% since 2015, leading to job losses and falling family incomes. About a quarter of the population, including many doctors, teachers and sanitation workers, depend on civil servants. wages that are paid irregularly, if at all. There is food in Yemen, but those who cannot afford it risk starving to death.

“In Yemen, a child dies every 10 minutes from preventable causes, including malnutrition and vaccine-preventable diseases.

“The education of children in Yemen has also been severely affected by the war. Two million children are out of school and one in six schools can no longer be used. Two-thirds of teachers – over 170,000 teachers in total – did not receive regular salaries. for more than four years due to conflict and geopolitical divisions, putting an estimated four million more children at risk of interrupted education or dropping out of school as unpaid teachers drop out of teaching to find other ways to support their families.

“These are the numbers. But the numbers don’t really tell us what it is like to be a child growing up in Yemen today.

“Being a child in Yemen is watching your parents struggle to provide enough food for your family, without which you could starve. It means that if you are lucky enough to have a school to go to, you could be. killed by gunshot, explosion or walking over a mine while walking along the road to get there.

“Or maybe you are one of the children recruited to join the fight, used by a party in a non-combat role, or forced into marriage because your family has no options.

“Being a child in Yemen means that you have likely experienced or witnessed horrific violence to which no child should ever be exposed. This means that if you survive the war, you could carry the physical and emotional scars with you for the rest of your life. life, compromising your development and your happiness as an adult.

“Fighting around your community means that you may not be able to get your polio or measles vaccine. And if you do get sick, there may not be a hospital or clinic where you can get it. make you safe.

“Being a child in Yemen is having nightmares.

“We are doing everything we can to help the children get through this ordeal. Alongside our partners, we provide access to safe drinking water and sanitation, as well as health, nutrition, protection and education services.

“These efforts include delivering vaccines and supporting primary health care centers and hospitals to keep them operational. We are responding to COVID-19 and providing emergency cash transfers to 1.5 million households each quarter, benefiting approximately 9 million people.

“Across the country, UNICEF supports the treatment of acute malnutrition in more than 4,000 primary health care facilities and 100 therapeutic feeding centers. We are working to rehabilitate schools and have provided financial support and supplies for high school students to sit for national exams.

“But none of this is enough given the scale of humanitarian needs amid the ongoing violence.

“Once again, I call on them to make every effort to keep children safe and meet their legal obligations to keep them out of the line of fire. This includes sparing critical infrastructure that children depend on from attacks – such as and sanitation systems.

“I want to stress that respecting and protecting education, including schools, students and teachers, is of the utmost importance for Yemeni children and youth. We remain gravely concerned about the severity and frequency of threats and attacks on education and the use of schools for the military. purposes.

“All sides bear responsibility for killing and maiming children and all sides have consistently failed to take the necessary precautions to protect civilians. It must stop.

“Such efforts are also crucial for demining work to be carried out safely and efficiently.

“Yemen imports almost everything, including humanitarian supplies. We need to reopen the port of Hudaydah to commercial imports and fuel. Millions more could be starved if vital imports remain limited.

“The last time I addressed the Security Council on Yemen was before the pandemic. COVID-19 has further complicated the already dire humanitarian situation. The health care system is hanging by a thread. The economy too. Immunization campaigns across the country must be carried out urgently. widespread, especially with the emergence of highly transmissible variants of COVID-19.

“UNICEF and our partners stand ready to work with the parties to ensure that civil servants’ salaries are paid regularly – a step that would put money back into the pockets of millions, helping families survive . It would also support the functioning of basic services which are essential to a successful humanitarian response.

“Likewise, we must also take measures to increase people’s incomes. This means protecting remittances, which are a lifeline for millions of families and are Yemen’s largest source of foreign exchange.

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How not to invest: the seven traps to avoid https://indigodreams.net/how-not-to-invest-the-seven-traps-to-avoid/ Mon, 09 Aug 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/how-not-to-invest-the-seven-traps-to-avoid/ OPINION: From inconveniences to nightmares, bad investments are available in every corner of New Zealand. Here’s how you can avoid handing your money over to people who turn dollars into cents. 1. Don’t put everything in one place Fifteen years ago, thousands of people renewed heavy obligations with Hanover, BridgeCorp and South Canterbury Finance. At […]]]>

OPINION: From inconveniences to nightmares, bad investments are available in every corner of New Zealand. Here’s how you can avoid handing your money over to people who turn dollars into cents.

1. Don’t put everything in one place

Fifteen years ago, thousands of people renewed heavy obligations with Hanover, BridgeCorp and South Canterbury Finance. At the time, they were trusted financial companies. And then they weren’t.

Diversified investments mean your money is spread to cushion the ups and downs if something terrible happens.

Unsplash

Diversified investments mean your money is spread to cushion the ups and downs if something terrible happens.

It’s easy to get complacent – by early 2007, $ 50,000 would turn into $ 54,000 effortlessly every six months. People also got caught with David Ross.

READ MORE:
* Beware of the hidden and money-hungry Draculas
* How to fatten your KiwiSaver balance
* So you want to be a millionaire …

But big comebacks quickly turned into bigger and bigger losses.

For these reasons, diversification is essential. Diversified investments mean your money is spread to cushion the ups and downs if something terrible happens.

2. Don’t go into rental real estate without understanding the economy and obligations

It’s a myth that you buy a rental, the price goes up 15% per year, and you earn around 100% on your real money, since leverage is usually high.

The reality is different. You have to find tenants (or pay someone else to manage them). You have to pay municipal rate bills, fix things, make sure your property meets Healthy Homes standards, and pay taxes.

It's a myth that when you buy a rental, the price goes up by 15% per year.

Things

It’s a myth that when you buy a rental, the price goes up by 15% per year.

People are unreliable, both agents and tenants, and you can get caught up in a problem you are not used to. Repairs are inevitable – a new roof or carpet replacement easily costs over $ 10,000.

Even at $ 600 per week for rent, those costs to pay now consume a lot of rent money. And you’ll have to pay the mortgage and spin all the other plates.

Unless you are committed to the property (i.e. understanding it and making it work) it can be a risky investment despite what the numbers say.

3. Never invest in things you don’t understand

It happens all the time. People go crazy for bright and promising things.

In 2012-14, Pacific Edge was all the rage – it went from 15 cents to $ 1.50 in about 18 months. It then fell to 10 cents before finding grace in late 2020 and 2021 (now above $ 1.20).

Problem is, people saw it as a gold rush in 2012 and bought it big. The company’s turnover was still developing 10 years ago – and still is today.

Bladder cancer treatments at the Pacific Edge center have the potential to be huge. But investing too early in a bullish rush and selling in a panic later locks in losses.

Christopher Walsh: “If you don't understand the basics of the business and its customers, it's hard to justify the investment.

Provided

Christopher Walsh: “If you don’t understand the basics of the business and its customers, it’s hard to justify the investment.

Let’s take another example: If everyone you know is subscribing to Netflix, it may resonate with you as something you want to invest in. On the other hand, if no one you know subscribes to Sky TV, and there is a lot of competition entering the market, you might be wondering if Sky TV is a good investment.

If you don’t understand the basics of the business and its customers, it’s hard to justify the investment.

4. Do not act on the FOMO

There was a lot of FOMO with crypto, MyFoodBag and BurgerFuel IPOs, and frenzied house buying just before the GFC. Anyone late to the party can find themselves losing a lot of money.

One thing is true: if an investment is fantastic, it will be there for years to come. Profitable investments generally do not follow a boom-bust-boom-bust-boom trajectory.

5. Never judge a book by its cover

Anyone can dress smart and sell a dream. However, cynics (and financially exhausted) may think that the best dressed people who sell investment products might be handling something unsavory. That doesn’t mean to trust those who wear scruffy shoes – the Loizos Michaels case proves it.

6. Don’t rush into the fine print

Brent Sheather, a financial advice provider and personal finance / investments writer, points out a good rule of thumb.

For investors who do not care to read and / or understand the information statements, the longer the information statement, the less attractive the investment / advisor.

As a general rule, the longer the declaration, the less attractive the investment / advisor.

SCOTT GRAHAM / UNSPLASH

As a general rule, the longer the declaration, the less attractive the investment / advisor.

7. Avoid trusting your loved ones

As the useful Mexican saying goes, “there is nothing more dangerous than a fool with initiative.”

Every now and then a family member will talk about a great investment. Sadly, many family fortunes have been lost when well-meaning (but weak) parents push people too scared to ruffle feathers and make a series of dire financial decisions that ruin the entire family’s finances and relationships.

Don’t fall for this rather common trap.

– Christopher Walsh is the founder of MoneyHub.co.nz.


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Woman from Warwick attacks victim with studded length of wood in front of screaming children – but is spared jail https://indigodreams.net/woman-from-warwick-attacks-victim-with-studded-length-of-wood-in-front-of-screaming-children-but-is-spared-jail/ Fri, 06 Aug 2021 08:51:00 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/woman-from-warwick-attacks-victim-with-studded-length-of-wood-in-front-of-screaming-children-but-is-spared-jail/ A woman who attacked her boyfriend’s ex-partner with a studded length of wood, leaving him with a lump on his forehead, has been spared jail. Michelle Harrison had pleaded guilty to assaulting her victim, causing her bodily harm. Harrison (38) of Poins Close, Heathcote, Warwick was given a 14 month suspended prison sentence for two […]]]>

A woman who attacked her boyfriend’s ex-partner with a studded length of wood, leaving him with a lump on his forehead, has been spared jail.

Michelle Harrison had pleaded guilty to assaulting her victim, causing her bodily harm.

Harrison (38) of Poins Close, Heathcote, Warwick was given a 14 month suspended prison sentence for two years by a Warwick Crown Court judge who said she had ‘clean shaven’.

Michelle harrison

She was also ordered to participate in a rehabilitation activity and subjected to an injunction not to contact her victim or to approach her home for two years.

During the attack, Harrison rushed towards his victim with a plank of wood with a nail driven into each end, and a “fierce attack ensued and she was punched in the face, head and chest. neck”.

As a result of the brutal attack, his victim suffered facial injuries and a number of puncture wounds.

In a statement, her victim said she had since suffered from nightmares and psychological trauma and feared leaving home with her children, who saw the assault on her.

She said she now had a gash on her forehead from one of the blows and damage to a ligament in one of her fingers.

Mr Simpson added that when Harrison, whose previous convictions included five violent offenses, was arrested later that day, she claimed she was acting in self-defense.

Ian Gold, in defense, said: “You will not hear any apologies from my client, through me, presented in court. She accepted the entire prosecution case. “

He added that there was a story at the time between the victim and his ex-partner, who was now Harrison’s partner.

Mr. Simpson added: “My client had no relationship with the complainant in this matter and barely knew him.

“She was the girlfriend and had no role in babysitting the children except to be home when they visited.

“However, the day before this incident, the victim’s new boyfriend was driving back and forth looking for my client and (his partner) while they were shopping.

“He shot the car at them twice, which they immediately reported to the police. But it took the police several days to try and examine the video surveillance of the incident, and it had been erased by then.

“On the day in question, my client was in very poor mental and physical condition. She suffers from epilepsy and multiple personality disorders, and she was recovering from drug addiction.

“She had very little recollection of the incident. She had badly beaten this lady in a savage way, and regretted it from that day until today.

“She has had over a year to worry about the consequences of what she has done and to seek rehabilitation, and she has done so in a meaningful way.”

In condemning Harrison, Recorder Levett told him, “This was a horrendous example of violence against a woman in the presence of her children.

“There were 12 separate hits, spilling blood in several places, including his head, and causing ligament damage affecting his work and causing a financial impact.

“The attack was not provoked, and it was a major attack. The children were screaming and could clearly see their mother being attacked by you.

“But I take into account your remorse, which I sincerely accept, and the efforts you have made to change your life since then. It was a close shave. Keep up the good work.


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