Sleep Difficulties – Indigo Dreams http://indigodreams.net/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 11:21:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://indigodreams.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1.png Sleep Difficulties – Indigo Dreams http://indigodreams.net/ 32 32 How to limit your anxiety about events beyond your control https://indigodreams.net/how-to-limit-your-anxiety-about-events-beyond-your-control/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 10:06:00 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/how-to-limit-your-anxiety-about-events-beyond-your-control/ Lesley Alderman, LCSW, is a Brooklyn-based psychotherapist. A patient of mine showed up for her virtual psychotherapy session last week looking tired. She had always been ambitious and concerned about injustice. During this session, she sighed as she recalled a meeting where her colleagues complained about unfair treatment. She said: “I don’t know why they […]]]>

Lesley Alderman, LCSW, is a Brooklyn-based psychotherapist.

A patient of mine showed up for her virtual psychotherapy session last week looking tired. She had always been ambitious and concerned about injustice. During this session, she sighed as she recalled a meeting where her colleagues complained about unfair treatment. She said: “I don’t know why they bother to get upset, when it feels like nothing matters.”

I was concerned about his disengagement. But then a colleague also seemed exhausted. She had spent the pandemic helping her third and fourth graders in school remotely while trying to keep her small business going. She told me: “I haven’t followed the war in Ukraine at all, I just don’t have the bandwidth.

To an unusual degree, people are tired.

In the spring of 2020, right at the start of the pandemic, the question my patients asked was, “When do you think things will get back to normal?” Now no one talks to me about getting back to normal. There is a tacit recognition that the chaos we are experiencing could be with us for a long time.

Patients who had been preoccupied with national and global events and visibly frightened during the pandemic now seem exhausted. The murder of George Floyd was horrific and mass shootings are becoming more common. Now, it feels like we’re all in a relentless game of molestation, but in this case rodents are existential threats.

I notice that many of my patients suffer from an optimism deficit and are overwhelmed on important matters beyond their control.

I call it “hope fatigue”.

People are tired of hoping that the pandemic will end, the war in Ukraine will be over, the mass shootings can be controlled, and our government can deal with these urgent crises. Two in 10 Americans said they trust the government in Washington to do the right thing “almost always” or “most of the time” in a 2022 Pew Research Center poll.

Pandemic anxiety makes us sleepless, forgetful and angry. Here are some tips for coping.

The symptoms of this fatigue are anxiety, disconnection or abandonment.

“People are struggling a lot – covid has hurt us a lot. And now they’re not sure about the state of the world,” said Paul Slovic, a professor of psychology at the University of Oregon who has studied the psychology of risk and decision-making for more than 60 years. .

Therapists struggle to help. We try to instill a sense of hope in our patients: that they can feel better, that they have agency, that their catastrophic thoughts can exaggerate reality. But when a patient laments climate change and wonders if they should have children, that’s a challenge.

It is sometimes tempting to empathize with them, but it is not productive. I try to validate their concern and then explore what it means to them personally.

Our nervous system was not designed for this

Many of the issues threaten our basic sense of security. Will my community be decimated by fires, are my children safe at school, could there be a nuclear war?

“I see a lot of people ‘going through life’ but, since they don’t know what to do with life, how to protect themselves, how to have control over anything or make a difference in anything either, how to have fun, they slip into a kind of detachment,” said psychologist Judy Levitz, founding director of the Center for the Study of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy in New York.

Humans need to feel like they have some degree of control. When you take away a person’s sense of security, depression and anxiety can set in. Our nervous system was simply not designed to deal with so many crises at once.

It’s no wonder 33% of Americans reported symptoms of depression and anxiety this summer, compared to just 11% who reported these symptoms in 2019, according to the Centers for Disease Control’s Household Pulse Survey. and Prevention.

How to keep up with terrible news without burning out

Eight Steps to Refocusing Your Anxiety

Dwelling on problems that seem impossible to solve can lead to anxiety paralysis, but there is hope.

“Just because you can’t solve a problem doesn’t mean you should ignore it,” said Slovic, whose website The Arithmetic of Compassion highlights barriers to humanitarian decision-making. . “We are not helpless.”

This is part of the advice I give to my patients.

Take a break from the news. Doomscrolling can be addictive and amplify the tragic nature of events. In one study, researchers found that those who were immersed in news of the Boston Marathon bombing for several hours a day in the week after the event experienced higher acute stress than people who were at the scene. . “We suspect that the graphic nature of the coverage and the repetition of these images triggered intense distress,” said Roxane Cohen Silver, lead author of the study and a distinguished professor of psychological sciences, public health and medicine at the ‘University of California. in Irvin.

I advise patients who feel depressed by headlines to read the news only once a day, turn off alerts on their phones, and, if possible, check social media sparingly.

Take care of yourself. I tell my patients: “You have to be in good physical shape to face the current turbulence. This means building your resilience by taking care of your nervous system (sleep well, eat well, exercise wisely) and engage in vital activities.

Focus on the present. Make a habit of anchoring yourself here and now. Worrying about the future is pointless.

Try a breathing exercise. Taking a few deep breaths – for example, inhaling to five and exhaling to five – will help calm your sympathetic nervous system (the fight or flight response) and reduce your anxiety.

When I offer deep breathing exercises, some of my patients may be skeptical, as if I’m offering some kind of new-age gibberish. But I remind them that the exercises are based on science. They usually report that at the very least, the breath gives them something to do when they feel their heart rate increase.

Think about your victories. Remind yourself of what’s working well in your own life – whether it’s your job, your friendships, or the uplifting array of houseplants you’ve grown during the pandemic.

What science tells us about the mood-boosting effects of houseplants

Be your own therapist. Ask yourself, why am I specifically feeling hopeless and why? Being able to put into words what is depressing you can help you feel less overwhelmed by emotions and better able to process information rationally.

Take action. Worrying doesn’t help mental health, but taking action does. Look around in your community. Perhaps your local playground would benefit from a basketball court, or your church or synagogue could sponsor a refugee family. When people engage with local issues, they get a boost of optimism.

Join a friend. Choose a cause. There are hundreds of nonprofit organizations dedicated to addressing some of the world’s most stubborn challenges. Give money to an inspiring organization or volunteer.

Slovic offers this advice: “Think about what you can do rather than what you can’t.”

Are you a mental health professional who would like to contribute to this column? E-mail OnYourMind@washpost.com.

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Tips for staying healthy during menopause https://indigodreams.net/tips-for-staying-healthy-during-menopause/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 07:40:02 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/tips-for-staying-healthy-during-menopause/ Every woman is affected by menopause in a unique way. Many symptoms including irregular periods, hot flashes, sweating, trouble sleeping, mood swings, irritability, hip and back pain, etc. are associated with this condition. transition for many women. “Indian women generally go through menopause early, at the average age of 46.2, five years earlier than in […]]]>

Every woman is affected by menopause in a unique way. Many symptoms including irregular periods, hot flashes, sweating, trouble sleeping, mood swings, irritability, hip and back pain, etc. are associated with this condition. transition for many women.

“Indian women generally go through menopause early, at the average age of 46.2, five years earlier than in Western countries. Hormonal changes begin even earlier during peri-menopause or the period around menopause , which lasts four years or even up to a decade.During this period, 80% of women are affected by the symptoms of menopause.A holistic approach to managing this phase can help women relieve discomfort and stay healthy,” said Jaideep Malhotra, former president of the Menopause Society of India and the Federation of South Asian Menopause Societies.

The secret to a healthier life is to prepare for this time, just as we do for other life stages like job interviews and parenthood. Here are four general actions you can take to better manage menopause:

Maintain a balanced diet

Proper nutrition is a game-changer for managing menopausal symptoms, from hot flashes to bloating. Foods to include and avoid in your diet are:

To understand

* Fruits and vegetables: they are full of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that your body needs. You can’t go wrong with seasonal vegetables and fresh fruit.

*Fiber: Rich Foods and Foods High in Calcium and Vitamin D: Foods high in fiber like leafy greens, kidney beans, and whole grains may also promote better health. Dairy products and foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids are good sources of nutrition.

Avoid

* Fatty meats and processed foods: Fast or fried foods, processed snacks, and meat are high in sodium, which makes you feel bloated. These foods can also affect cholesterol levels or increase your risk of heart disease. Additionally, spicy foods can trigger symptoms such as hot flashes.

* Alcohol: moderation is key. Regular alcohol consumption can lead to an amplification of menopausal symptoms, sleep disturbances and increased mental health problems.

* Caffeine: A caffeine kick makes you more likely to have hot flashes. The use of alternative hot drinks is suggested.

stay active

Regular exercise can keep your bones strong, improve your mood, and fight symptoms like weight gain as your body changes. You can try the following activities:

* Cardio: Aerobic or cardio activities include endurance activities that encourage you to use your large muscles. You can start with 10 minutes a day of brisk walking, jogging, swimming, running, biking, or even dancing, and increase the intensity as you go.

* Strength Training: Lifting dumbbells or using weight machines can help strengthen your muscles and bones, while reducing body fat

* Yoga: Yoga poses – from restorative and supportive yoga to power yoga – are also a good source of targeted symptom relief, helping to relax the body. Combined with meditation or breathing exercises, they can also encourage relaxation and mindfulness.

Mental Health

Emotional and mental health can be affected by hormonal changes during peri-menopause or menopause. Women who go through this stage may experience symptoms including insomnia, anxiety, immobility, exhaustion, stress, or depression. Most symptoms can be controlled by changing your lifestyle. These symptoms can be alleviated with exercise, healthy eating habits, drinking plenty of water, and relaxation techniques for restful sleep. Find what works for you and set realistic and achievable goals.

See a doctor

Comorbid conditions, such as osteoporosis and heart disease, which postmenopausal women are more likely to develop, can be prevented by maintaining good health. Additionally, there are a variety of treatment options for menopausal symptoms, such as menopausal hormone therapy, which can help keep your body’s estrogen levels stable and control symptoms. If you experience symptoms that concern you, it is always advisable to seek medical attention.

“Menopause is a time of transition for women, which can be difficult. At Abbott, we believe it is essential to raise awareness of the general physical, mental and emotional aspects of menopause, so that women can seek the help they may need and experience this. At the same time, we partner with healthcare professionals to share therapeutic best practices and change the way we approach women going through menopause, to support women holistically, beyond the physical symptoms,” said Jejoe Karankumar, Chief Medical Officer, Abbott India.

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We review wearable gadgets that can improve your health https://indigodreams.net/we-review-wearable-gadgets-that-can-improve-your-health/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 23:23:30 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/we-review-wearable-gadgets-that-can-improve-your-health/ From digital insoles that correct your gait to bracelets that track your fertility, wearable health technology is a booming industry. But are these gadgets, which can be very expensive, an accurate way to check our health? “Fitness trackers can play a role in motivating us to exercise and become more aware of our well-being,” says […]]]>

From digital insoles that correct your gait to bracelets that track your fertility, wearable health technology is a booming industry.

But are these gadgets, which can be very expensive, an accurate way to check our health?

“Fitness trackers can play a role in motivating us to exercise and become more aware of our well-being,” says Professor Ian Swaine, sport and exercise scientist at the University of Greenwich .

“However, novelty often fades and while there have been significant advances over the past two decades, the technology involves sensors that are not always reliable, combined with computer estimations and algorithms that transform numbers into results – and research has shown this can be fraught with inaccuracy.

London-based GP Dr Nisa Aslam adds that while some of this technology can help monitor conditions such as diabetes, “initial health assessments and annual checks should still be done in person by a healthcare professional”.

We asked Professor Swaine and Dr Aslam for their thoughts on some of the latest gadgets; we then evaluated them.

From digital insoles that correct your gait to wristbands that track your fertility, wearable health tech is a booming industry

Cardiac activity and “watch”

Fitbit Charge 5, £129.99, fitbit.com

Claim: The “most advanced” Fitbit, it monitors activity, heart rate and sleep patterns, checks for “irregular heart rhythms” with an ECG and measures stress with an electrodermal activity (EDA) sensor, explains the manufacturer. A daily “readiness score” advises exercise or rest.

Expert verdict: “This reflects the trend towards home health management, fueled in part by the difficulties of seeing GPs face to face,” says Prof Swaine. “But a wrist monitor should never replace a doctor when it comes to heart health, because wrist sensors can’t measure irregular heart rhythms very accurately.

“It claims to identify stress levels through an EDA sensor – by measuring skin sweat – but we sweat for many reasons.

“The ‘Readiness Score’ might help you become aware of the need to rest sometimes, but overall there isn’t a lot of scientific data to back up the new features.”

5/10

Patch to monitor blood sugar

FreeStyle Libre 2, £96.58, freestylelibre.co.uk

Claim: This sticky sensor connects to an app and can be used to “check your blood sugar anytime, anywhere, with just a scan of your smartphone.” An alarm will sound on your phone if the levels are too high or too low.

Expert verdict: “This clinically accurate device is a game-changer for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes and is available to some on the NHS,” says Dr Aslam.

“The small, unobtrusive sensor, worn for 14 days, monitors glucose levels in interstitial fluid – the clear fluid that sits just under the skin – freeing patients from the hassle and pain of needle-stick blood glucose monitoring. finger.

“Readings show whether glucose is trending up or down. An alarm alerts patients if their blood sugar is too low or too high. This saves a lot of hassle and provides peace of mind.

9/10

Bracelet that monitors fertility

Ava Fertility Tracker, £249, avawomen.com

Claim: This bracelet helps women track their monthly cycle by monitoring nine ‘biomarkers’ including skin temperature, respiration, heart rate and blood flow. Worn at night, it lets you know each morning if it’s a good day to try for a baby. The manufacturer says it can detect an average of “five fertile days per cycle with 89% accuracy.”

Expert Verdict: “Studies show that temperature and heart rate change throughout a woman’s monthly cycle, increasing around the days of ovulation, when an egg is released from the fallopian tubes and a woman is the most fertile,” says Dr Aslam.

“Tracking these factors can tell with a fairly high degree of accuracy when ovulation is occurring.

“There is solid research behind this, but this bracelet is very expensive. I suggest patients keep a diary using inexpensive ovulation tests purchased from pharmacies. That’s enough for most.

7/10

Sleep tracking that you slip into your pocket

WHOOP 4.0, £264, whoop.com

Claim: Worn on the wrist or inserted into the inside pockets of sports bras and pajamas to monitor “heart rate, respiratory rate, blood oxygen level and skin temperature, it also tracks sleeping and breathing habits,” says the manufacturer.

Expert’s verdict: “Monitoring heart rate and physical movement during sleep provides some insight, but measuring overall sleep quality requires a polysomnogram – a brain scan where electrodes measure brain waves, movements muscles, breathing and heart rate,” says Professor Swaine.

“Using this type of tracker can make people obsess over how many hours of sleep they get. A better test is how you feel doing your daily activities.

4/10

Worn on the wrist or tucked into the inside pockets of sports bras and pajamas for monitoring

Worn on the wrist or inserted into the inside pockets of sports bras and pajamas to monitor “heart rate, respiratory rate, blood oxygen level and skin temperature, it also tracks body habits. sleep and breathing”, explains the manufacturer. A stock photo is used above

Heart Rate Headphones

Amazfit PowerBuds Pro, £59, amazon.co.uk

Claim: These wireless headphones “measure your heart rate while you exercise” and give “posture reminders” if you sit too long.

Expert verdict: “Measuring heart rate during exercise can, in theory, help you regulate your effort as you go and estimate the intensity of your work,” says Professor Swaine.

“It works well during aerobic exercises such as running or cycling, but it’s not very helpful for resistance exercises such as weights or Pilates, where you can work your muscles hard.”

“Ear monitors measure heart rate through changes in reflected light as it passes through the skin inside the ear, but chest monitors are more accurate because they are closer to the heart.

“‘Posture reminder’ is based on the idea that you are less active when you sit more.

“However, research shows that you get health benefits from separate bouts of exercise, so the jury is out on whether this is helpful.”

7/10

Bracelet to solve snoring

Viatom Sleep Pulse Oximeter, £134.99, stressnomore.co.uk

Claim: A wrist monitor that measures blood oxygen levels to help ‘Covid patients detect deterioration’. It also acts as a “sleep apnea monitor”, explains the manufacturer.

Expert’s verdict: “Sleep apnea is a condition in which breathing temporarily stops while you sleep, causing snoring and low oxygen levels,” says Dr. Aslam.

‘This wristband and finger sensor monitors oxygen levels while you sleep and vibrates if they drop to a preset low level. Could be useful for people with sleep apnea, Covid-19, pneumonia and COPD [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a term for conditions which cause breathing problems]warning the wearer to seek prompt medical attention.

“A much cheaper alternative is a pulse oximeter that you clip onto your finger, which costs around £10 and is very accurate.”

8/10

Watch to check hydration

Mifo Walkabout 2 watch, £69.99, mifo.co.uk

Claim: “A waterproof smartwatch that measures heart rate, blood oxygen, hydration, sleep patterns and stress levels,” says the manufacturer.

Expert Verdict: “Hydration is predicted based on how much exercise you have done and how much water you are likely to have lost” [about one litre per hour during exercise] – it can’t actually measure the water levels in our cells,” says Professor Swaine.

“Most people know to avoid exercising without water. You should use the feeling of thirst to dictate how much water you drink.

“It also claims to measure stress through ‘heart rate variability.’ However, these fluctuations are notoriously difficult to measure and interpret accurately.

“It is, however, a general fitness tracker at a reasonable price.”

6/10

Insoles to improve your gait

Digitsole, £89.99, decathlon.co.uk

Claim: Digital insoles that promise to measure “ten aspects of your walking or running technique,” ​​the maker says, “to improve your stride technique and efficiency.”

Expert verdict: “These contain built-in sensors that measure changes in pressure as you walk or run,” says Tim Veysey-Smith, sports podiatrist at Active Podiatry in Goudhurst, Kent.

‘It helps to measure stride length, foot strike pattern and pronation and supination speed [rolling in and out of the foot, respectively].

“But knowing what to do with the data can be difficult. You must work with a qualified expert so that it can be interpreted correctly.

7/10

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Steve Carell looks sexy in ‘The Patient’ on Hulu https://indigodreams.net/steve-carell-looks-sexy-in-the-patient-on-hulu/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 23:07:56 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/steve-carell-looks-sexy-in-the-patient-on-hulu/ In The patient, the big new Hulu show from the creators of Americans, Steve Carell plays Dr. Alan Strauss. His silver hair is impeccably styled and his salt and pepper beard is not a bit crooked. He is friendly, warm and easy to talk to, all the perfect elements of a great therapist. He even […]]]>

In The patient, the big new Hulu show from the creators of Americans, Steve Carell plays Dr. Alan Strauss. His silver hair is impeccably styled and his salt and pepper beard is not a bit crooked. He is friendly, warm and easy to talk to, all the perfect elements of a great therapist. He even wears a comforting cardigan.

Despite his harmless and calming nature, things don’t go particularly well for Dr. Strauss. He wakes up one morning chained to a bed in the basement of one of his patients, who asks the therapist to help curb his overwhelming desire to kill.

On a show where he’s the prisoner of a killer, desperate to escape alive, Carell comes across as one thing: sexy. Yes, what I’m saying is Steve Carell has absolutely never been hotter than he is in The patienta very unsexy sight.

I know that might sound…unbalanced, but hear me out: I just couldn’t help but think how extremely handsome Carell is as Dr. Strauss, even though he spends the series chained to a bed in a murderer’s basement. Or, honestly, maybe that’s one of the many reasons why.

Since The patient is a deliciously twisty two-handed, we spend a lot of time with Carell’s Dr. Strauss. This is our most intimate look at Carell as a performer since he was on Office, and it’s a phenomenal experience. He’s never felt more accessible than he does here, and no, it’s not because he’s unable to leave the room he’s stuck in. , and strives every day to be a better person. He is not a victim, despite his situation, nor is he a martyr. Instead, he is a fully realized person.

The show makes it clear that Strauss is by no means perfect. He struggled to keep his family together, and at times it threatened to consume him. This vulnerability is essential to arriving at what makes this character so desirable. Perfection is nice to think about, but it quickly becomes boring, and how can someone develop further in life if they are (allegedly) perfect?

That said, it really does look perfect. Strauss is nicely put together, the kind of guy who takes some pleasure in taking care of himself. I can see him taking the time to get a manicure, opting for a more expensive haircut and homemade beard oil to keep everything looking good Costs. Carell is rarely seen in movies or on TV with facial hair, and his salt-and-pepper beard looks so sexy it’s a wonder she hasn’t featured prominently in every appearance. , and it also feels like there’s a chiseled jawline just waiting to be unleashed underneath.

The show has an almost playful self-awareness of its beauty. Strauss certainly knows he’s a handsome boy, but he’d never dream of flaunting it: he’s far more interested in listening to your thoughts and uplifting you at every opportunity. A nice guy who isn’t scary and listens well? If you’re not sweating yet, you’re a liar.

While he cares about maintaining a good appearance (and damn it!), Strauss never once gives the impression that he’s conceited. He is above all a father and a dedicated therapist. Not only does he come across as a man who will cook you all your favorite meals while listening to your troubles, but he’s also fierce. Yes, Dr. Strauss is clearly ready to eviscerate anyone who crosses your path. As they say on the internet, it protects, but it also attacks.

If that’s not enough, there’s a scene where he tries to unlock his chains with a plastic fork with such ferocity and energy that I nearly fainted from the heat I felt. He’s ready to fight for you, and he’s also ready to fight for himself.

There’s also something specific about Carell’s character here that makes me feel so hot and bothered: Strauss is Jewish. His recently deceased wife was even the cantor of their synagogue. There will likely be controversy over Carell, a non-Jewish person, playing a Jewish character, especially in a role where his Jewish identity is so important. But Carell’s performance is never offensive; his approach to playing a Jewish American man is empathetic and thoughtful. More importantly, it allows me, as a Jewish person, to live in the fantasy of bringing this version of Steve Carell home to my parents, who would be delighted if I brought home a lovely Jewish therapist who has successful. It’s a win for everyone!

Watching the actor play a character as complex and inflexible as Dr. Strauss made me think about what Carell is outside of my fantasies. It is practically non-existent on social networks; maybe that’s the sexiest thing about him. I think it’s fair to say that the happy, well-adjusted rich have absolutely no need to tweet about their daily lives, post meaningless selfies on Instagram, or partake in the latest TikTok trend. Instead, it’s easy to imagine Carell relaxing on his couch, eating something so fancy I don’t even know exists, hanging out with his kids, and not caring. His ability to maintain such privacy helps complete the fantasy that Carell really is the man of my dreams.

Yeah, Steve Carell is a human being, and he probably is not as carefree as he is in my dreams. But it is okay! I am ready to listen to his problems, as he will surely listen to mine. Stories from those who have worked with him have repeatedly mentioned what a great person he is, both on camera and off set. On podcasts office ladieshosted by Carell alumnus Office co-stars Jenna Fischer and Angela Kinsey, and The desktop in depthhosted by Brian Baumgartner, the three hosts became poetic about what an amazing guy he is.

Melora Hardin, who played one of Carell’s lovers on Officesaid the The desktop in depth, “Immediately, I loved working with Steve… I was so relieved and so grateful and excited every time the cameras rolled. I felt like Steve was very playful with me on camera in terms of his ability to give and take. Give and take? I need a moment. This praise adds fuel to the sexy fire proclaiming Carell as the secretly sexiest hottie in Hollywood.

Except it’s not really that secret, in my opinion. He might not have the chiseled looks that get a guy hired for a major blockbuster, but these days a six-pack doesn’t have to be sexy. (That said, there’s something very tempting about Carell’s costume in The patient, which leads you to believe he has the muscle to lift you like a barbell.) A lot of people like a nice, funny, goofy guy! Even if it is not strange in itself, however, The patient stands out as the first time Carell was allowed to be hot. And it’s one of Hollywood’s biggest shames.

Take his most famous role, for example: everyone’s (least) favorite manager, Michael Scott. Although he becomes friendlier over the years Office, Michael is very often the butt of the joke. He is mocked by his subordinates for telling nonsensical jokes, wearing women’s costumes, and making one terrible decision after another. Even when his smarmy, unflattering Season 1 hair gives way to a much more appealing cut — and he ends up sleeping with his hot, powerful boss — Michael is still seen as a goofball.

The times he’s had the chance to prove his potential as a Hollywood idol, the movies haven’t fully allowed it. In The 40 year old virgin, Carell plays Andy, a dorky tech store clerk who isn’t about to have sex, despite really wanting to. The film takes him through a fun spin on a makeover, the climax of which comes when he gets his (important) body hair tweezed. It’s hysterical, but the goal is clearly to laugh at Andy, whose experience is fun and torturous. His transformation is more from “total dork” to “kinda cute dork” in the film; if there are flashes of sexual energy (he loses his virginity at the end!), it’s always in the form of a joke.

Carell was even quite hot during his Desk days – it’s just that no one would let him kiss her.

NBC

In crazy and stupid love, Carell is a recent divorcee who enlists the help of a sex geek (Ryan Gosling) to become the kind of guy every woman wants to sleep with. It’s the closest Hollywood has come to acknowledging Carrell’s sexual charisma. But he’s swallowed up by this concept of Cal being a lovable, heartwarming doofus, someone who needs the legit handsome gosling to teach him how to fuck. In these films, Carell needs a makeover to gain some kind of attractiveness; in The patientit becomes sexy and suave from the first hit.

The patient is not only a fantastic opportunity to show what a wonderful actor he is, but it’s also a golden opportunity to announce to the world that Steve Carell is incredibly hot. Whether The patient, a show where Carell is a creepy prisoner fighting for survival can embrace his hot guy era, it’s time other projects take notice. Long live our sexy, vulnerable, and maybe even approachable king.

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What Happens To Your Body When You Start Taking Anti-Anxiety Medication https://indigodreams.net/what-happens-to-your-body-when-you-start-taking-anti-anxiety-medication/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 14:28:00 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/what-happens-to-your-body-when-you-start-taking-anti-anxiety-medication/ Some anti-anxiety medications work their magic by improving your mood and making you feel better. For example, buspirone affects your levels of serotonin and dopamine, the main “feel-good” neurotransmitters in your brain (via Brain Research). Buspirone works as a partial serotonin agonist: it increases serotonin receptor activity by binding to and stimulating the 5HT1A receptor. […]]]>

Some anti-anxiety medications work their magic by improving your mood and making you feel better. For example, buspirone affects your levels of serotonin and dopamine, the main “feel-good” neurotransmitters in your brain (via Brain Research). Buspirone works as a partial serotonin agonist: it increases serotonin receptor activity by binding to and stimulating the 5HT1A receptor. It also antagonizes (blocks) dopamine receptors to a lesser degree, increasing the availability of dopamine in the brain. This is how buspirone is supposed to help you feel better when stress and anxiety come crashing down.

Anxiolytic is commonly prescribed to relieve symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), such as fear, tension, and rapid heartbeat. Because it does not act on GABA receptors, buspirone lacks the hypnotic and muscle relaxant properties of benzos, notes a 2022 study published in Drug Design, Development and Therapy. Therefore, chemical dependence and withdrawal symptoms are much less common with buspirone than with benzos or barbiturates.

In addition to treating GAD, buspirone has been used to manage symptoms of various neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, attention deficit disorder, and depression (via Brain Research). There is evidence that it may be useful in treating behavioral disorders often seen in people with dementia, autism spectrum disorders and chronic schizophrenia (via drug design, development and therapy).

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How heat waves harm mental health https://indigodreams.net/how-heat-waves-harm-mental-health/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/how-heat-waves-harm-mental-health/ NEW YORK — Tens of millions of people across the United States have endured heat wave after heat wave this summer, in what feels like a relentless succession of humid days and scorching temperatures. While it’s undeniable that extreme heat and humidity can be physically uncomfortable, research suggests that such conditions can also negatively affect […]]]>

NEW YORK — Tens of millions of people across the United States have endured heat wave after heat wave this summer, in what feels like a relentless succession of humid days and scorching temperatures. While it’s undeniable that extreme heat and humidity can be physically uncomfortable, research suggests that such conditions can also negatively affect your psychological well-being.

“We are seeing across the mental health spectrum” that extreme temperatures are detrimental to mental well-being, said Dr. Nick Obradovich, social scientist in computing at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and co-author from a 2018 study that analyzed the mental health risks of climate change.

Studies have linked rising temperatures to a range of mental health issues, including mental fatigue, aggression and even higher suicide rates. This connection isn’t just limited to temperature spikes, Dr. Obradovich said, it’s also present for people living in climates where it’s consistently hot. (Although, of course, trends in mental health can also depend on various factors besides temperature.)

Scientists have yet to find out why this might be and whether the heat itself can cause brain changes that can lead to these effects. But regardless, experts say, it’s clear that oppressive heat is linked to poorer mental health.

WHAT THE RESEARCH SAYS

Evidence suggests that “extreme temperatures can influence everything from your daily mood to your likelihood of experiencing an acute mental health crisis,” Dr Obradovich said.

A study published in JAMA Psychiatry in February, for example, examined the medical records of more than 2.2 million adults who visited emergency departments in 2,775 counties across the United States between 2010 and 2019.

The authors found that there were about 8% more emergency room visits for mental health issues on the hottest days of summer than on the coolest days. Emergency room visits for issues such as self-harm, as well as substance abuse, anxiety, mood and schizophrenia disorders, all rose steadily in proportion to temperature.

This trend is “fairly consistent for men and women, for adults of all ages, and for people living in all parts of the United States,” said Dr. Amruta Nori-Sarma, an environmental health scientist at the Boston University School of Public Health and a study author.

Other research has also shown that higher temperatures can temporarily trigger relapses in people with bipolar disorder, and higher sun exposures can increase the risk of manic episodes. Higher temperatures have also been linked to deaths in people with schizophrenia and other mental health conditions.

Data from a survey of 1.9 million Americans between 2008 and 2013 found that on days with temperatures above 21°C, respondents were more likely to experience reduced joy and happiness, as well as an increase in stress, anger and fatigue, than on days with high temperatures. between 10°C and 15.5°C degrees. These associations were particularly strong when temperatures were above 32°C, the authors noted.

WHAT HAPPENS IN THE BODY?

“When we’re not comfortable, we’re not at our best,” said Dr. C. Munro Cullum, a clinical neuropsychologist at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. Heat discomfort and the energy needed to cool the body can reduce overall resilience. Thus, the restlessness, irritation and pain become less bearable, he says.

Our bodies are also used to some baseline level of stress, said Dr. Martin Paulus, chief scientific officer and president of the Laureate Institute for Brain Research in Tulsa, Oklahoma, who worked with Dr. Obradovich on his 2018 study.

When the body tries to regulate its temperature during a heat wave, he says, it adds extra tension and leads to more stress and inflammation. People with pre-existing mental health conditions may be particularly vulnerable to additional heat stress, which can worsen their symptoms, he said.

As for what happens in the brain during extreme heat, that’s hard to study, Dr. Paulus said. In a lab, you can experience how the brain and the rest of the body can withstand minutes or possibly hours of high temperatures, but you can’t do it for days, weeks or months at a time – and that it’s these longer exposures that are really important for understanding how climate change may affect us in the long term.

But the fact that this link between heat and mental health is so consistent in people around the world suggests that heat is doing something to the brain, Dr. Nori-Sarma said. Some researchers have speculated that heat may cause an imbalance in brain signaling or inflammation in the brain. But another prominent theory is that heat causes sleep disruptions, which in turn can worsen mental health symptoms.

Hot nights make sleep significantly worse, Dr. Obradovich said. “And we know from a large number of publications in psychology and psychiatry that lack of sleep, sleep difficulties and insomnia are very strongly linked to a deterioration in mental health over time. .”

It’s possible that the explanation for the effect of heat on mental health comes from a combination of these different existing theories, Dr. Obradovich added.

OTHER POTENTIAL ELEMENTS AT PLAY

Nor can we forget about climate anxiety, said Dr. Paulus. Wildfires and heat waves, among other weather-related events, are increasing in frequency and intensity due to climate change. As global warming worsens, eco-anxiety could exacerbate other symptoms of disaster-related stress, anxiety, depression or even post-traumatic stress, he added.

Some people are also more vulnerable to heat than others. In their 2018 study, Dr. Obradovich and Paulus’ team found that low-income people experienced more severe mental health effects from heat than those with higher incomes, and women experienced worse effects. only men. Together, they found that the effect of heat on mental health was twice as detrimental for low-income women as for high-income men.

In the middle of a heat wave, we don’t always know how to protect ourselves. But being aware of your heat exposure, staying hydrated, and avoiding the heat when you can are always good options. Caring for the people in your community is also a powerful and overlooked strategy, Dr. Nori-Sarma said.

It means “neighbors check in on neighbors, friends and families, make sure everyone is okay.”

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

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DWP PIP payments of £156 could be due to Britons who snore in their sleep – how to claim https://indigodreams.net/dwp-pip-payments-of-156-could-be-due-to-britons-who-snore-in-their-sleep-how-to-claim/ Sun, 21 Aug 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/dwp-pip-payments-of-156-could-be-due-to-britons-who-snore-in-their-sleep-how-to-claim/ BRITS who snore in their sleep could miss payments of £156 a week in Personal Independence Payments (PIPs) from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). The DWP payment could be a welcome boost for those struggling with the current cost of living crisis. A lot of Brits snore in their sleep, but it could […]]]>

BRITS who snore in their sleep could miss payments of £156 a week in Personal Independence Payments (PIPs) from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP).

The DWP payment could be a welcome boost for those struggling with the current cost of living crisis.

A lot of Brits snore in their sleep, but it could actually be a sign of sleep apnea. Figures show that more than 2,200 people across the UK are currently claiming PIP payments due to illness and other upper respiratory-related conditions.

Sleep Apnea NHS Symptoms

Sleep apnea occurs when the muscles in the back of the throat relax too much when breathing.

The NHS says symptoms of the disease usually occur while you are sleeping.

They understand:

  • stopping and restarting breathing
  • making gasping, snorting, or choking noises
  • wake up a lot
  • loud snoring

During the day, they may also include:

  • feel very tired
  • have trouble concentrating
  • have mood swings
  • having a headache when you wake up

How to claim the PIP

The PIP is a benefit which is gradually replacing the subsistence allowance for people with disabilities.

Payment is made every four weeks and up to 156 per week is available for people with specific health needs, conditions or disabilities.

Monthly payments can range from £97.80 to £627.60 each payment period.

To claim that you need to be assessed by a medical professional and that you have had difficulty moving around in the last three months, these difficulties would also have to continue for at least the next nine months.

To start your complaint you will need to call the PIP New Complaints Hotline on 0800 917 2222. You will then be given a form to complete and return and be aware that you may need an assessment if more information is required.

More information about applying for PIP can be found on the government website.

PIP tariffs 2022 to 2023

Eligibility is split into daily life and mobility with payments ranging from £24.45 to £156.90 per week.

The PIP is paid every four weeks, with eligible Britons receiving payments of between £97.80 and £627.60 each period.

Who is eligible for the PIP?

To be eligible for PIP you generally need to have lived in the UK for at least two of the last three years and be resident in the country at the time of applying for help.

To qualify, you must have a medical condition that has caused difficulty in daily living or getting around for three months and expect these difficulties to persist for at least nine months.

If you need help with daily tasks such as preparing or cooking food or getting around outside the home, you may consider asking for help.

Below is a list of the 24 conditions eligible for support through the PIP. Assessment assignment rates vary by disabling condition, and a PIP applicant’s primary disabling condition is recorded upon assessment.

Upper respiratory diseases

  • Sleep apnea – obstructive
  • Upper respiratory tract – Other diseases of / type unknown

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
  • chronic bronchitis
  • Emphysema

Bronchiectasis

Cystic fibrosis

Asthma

Pulmonary fibrosis

  • Extrinsic allergic alveolitis
  • Fibrosing alveolitis
  • Pulmonary fibrosis – Other / unknown type

Pneumoconiosis

  • Asbestosis
  • Pneumoconiosis – charcoal burners
  • Pneumoconiosis – Other / unknown type
  • Silicosis

Granulomatous pneumonitis and pulmonary infiltration

  • Granulomatous pneumonia and pulmonary infiltration – Other / type unknown
  • Sarcoidosis

Disease of the pleura

  • Empyema
  • Pleura – Other diseases of/unknown type
  • Pleural effusion
  • Pneumothorax

Lung transplant

Heart and Lung Transplantation

Pulmonary embolism

Pneumonia

For more information on the PIP and whether you might be eligible, go to the government website.

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Know the symptoms of post-covid disease and how to prevent this heart disease. https://indigodreams.net/know-the-symptoms-of-post-covid-disease-and-how-to-prevent-this-heart-disease/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 04:55:47 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/know-the-symptoms-of-post-covid-disease-and-how-to-prevent-this-heart-disease/ Know the symptoms of post-Covid disease and how to prevent this heart disease. The fight against the global pandemic continues in India as COVID-19 infections suddenly increase. Public health officials and medical professionals have urged the public to take precautions and watch for viral symptoms. A person who has recovered from COVID may suffer from […]]]>

Know the symptoms of post-Covid disease and how to prevent this heart disease.

The fight against the global pandemic continues in India as COVID-19 infections suddenly increase. Public health officials and medical professionals have urged the public to take precautions and watch for viral symptoms. A person who has recovered from COVID may suffer from a variety of post-COVID conditions.

After recovering from a coronavirus infection, long COVID symptoms persist for several weeks or months. When this time of year arrives, experts suggest getting plenty of rest, healthy eating, and light exercise.

Others may experience no illness with COVID-19, while others may experience mild, moderate, or severe symptoms. Four weeks is the average recovery time for COVID patients. Symptoms can persist for weeks or months even after a person has recovered. Sore throat, exhaustion and shortness of breath are some of the most common health problems. Virologist Dr Annette Alaeus, an online GP service, says heart palpitations are a common symptom.

Although the COVID-19 virus enters the body through the respiratory system, it is considered a systemic disease, rather than just a respiratory disease.

There is likely a link between this systemic involvement and immunity, and different individuals respond differently to infection.

More research is still needed to determine why long-term COVID sometimes causes heart palpitations. According to her, the virus would affect the autonomic nervous system rather than the heart.

A rapid, fluttering, or pounding heartbeat indicates heart palpitations, according to the Mayo Clinic. They are usually not harmful, but if they occur alongside other heart problems such as chest pain, body aches and shortness of breath, they can be alarming. A stress response, physical activity, particular medication, or medical condition can cause heart palpitations.

“We now know that COVID-19 can damage other parts of the body, including the heart, although COVID-19 was initially thought to be a respiratory disease,” says Dr. Alcaeus.

heart disease: heart disease and covid-19 |  heart

A clot can form anywhere in the body if the virus causes hyperinflammation. Because of this, certain organs are damaged due to the effects of the disease on the blood vessels.

In addition to heart palpitations, she recommends seeking immediate medical attention if you feel faint, short of breath, or have chest pains.

Here are some lifestyle habits to consider

The development of a long-term COVID treatment is still in its early stages. However, Dr. Alaeus stressed the importance of taking extra precautions to maintain good health, especially heart health. According to Dr. Annette Alaeus, some lifestyle habits include:

Consume less alcohol and caffeine and eat a balanced diet rich in fruits, vegetables and fibre.

Salt, sugar, trans fats and saturated fats should be avoided.

What you can do to improve your health by changing your lifestyle

The development of a long-term COVID treatment is still ongoing. While awaiting the results of the research, Dr. Alaeus urged people to take precautions to protect their heart health. Dr. Annette Alaeus suggests the following lifestyle habits:

Be sure to eat fruits, vegetables, and fiber-rich foods, and limit your alcohol and caffeine intake.

Keep trans fats, salt and sugar out of your diet.

covid-19 lung damage |  johns hopkins medicine

There is a wide range of symptoms associated with long COVID. You may also experience neurological symptoms like headaches, problems sleeping, disorientation, and difficulty thinking or concentrating in addition to general symptoms like severe coughing, exhaustion, and body aches. It’s possible that no matter how well you recover from COVID-19, psychological issues such as loss of taste, smell, or sadness will persist. Diarrhea and stomach aches have also been reported by some people.

What are the reasons why some people have not yet received COVID?

Genetic factors may keep the virus at bay or these people may just be lucky. Researchers are trying to determine which is the real one.

COVID-19 has infected 82% of Americans, but millions are still uninfected, according to the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation. Those who remained healthy are now being studied for their science.

In total, nearly 60 million people in the country have never been infected with COVID. Researchers want to determine if these people are just lucky or if genetic factors may prevent them from getting infected.

Internal medicine doctor Thomas Campbell says scientists don’t have much to say about why people don’t get sick. This will frustrate anyone who has ever gotten sick.

Dr. Campbell believes it was largely luck.

Research has shown that only one in four people living with someone with COVID also contract the virus, even with the highly contagious variants of Omicron. These low percentages indicate that people can be exposed and not get sick.

coronavirus complications: how covid-19 affects your lungs |  narayana health

In addition to timing, we know that when someone gets COVID early in their illness, they are more likely to pass it on to others.

According to Dr. Campbell, about five days after becoming ill, an infection can occur.

Therefore, if you come into contact with people outside of this window, you are less likely to be infected.

It’s not all about timing yet. A genetic component may also be involved. Researchers are currently investigating whether there is a protein or gene that keeps certain people healthy.

Campbell cited HIV as a well-studied example.

He says about 2% of Caucasians are unable to make the protein that HIV cells need to infect humans. HIV cannot infect people who lack this protein.

It is currently being investigated whether COVID-19 could be similar.

Some people may be protected against infection by genetic factors, he says, but they are likely to be rare.

Using HIV co-receptors, a class of drugs for the treatment of HIV has been developed,” said Dr. Campbell.

Finally, many people may think they haven’t had COVID because they’ve been asymptomatic. More than 28,000 COVID cases worldwide have been studied at the University of Bern in Switzerland, and 42% of those infected had no symptoms.

People who have never been infected are advised to wear masks, get vaccinated and socially isolate themselves. COVID can also be minimized or entirely prevented by maintaining good physical and mental health.

edited and proofread by nikita sharma

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It’s the biggest obstacle to sleep if you’re over 60, study finds https://indigodreams.net/its-the-biggest-obstacle-to-sleep-if-youre-over-60-study-finds/ Mon, 15 Aug 2022 21:41:53 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/its-the-biggest-obstacle-to-sleep-if-youre-over-60-study-finds/ For this study, the researchers wanted to assess the impact of different types of stress on the sleep of elderly people approaching retirement. The first study involved more than 2,700 adults and looked at factors such as physical and mental working conditions, stressful life events and work-life balance. An additional population study of nearly 4,000 […]]]>

For this study, the researchers wanted to assess the impact of different types of stress on the sleep of elderly people approaching retirement. The first study involved more than 2,700 adults and looked at factors such as physical and mental working conditions, stressful life events and work-life balance.

An additional population study of nearly 4,000 people found that more than half of Finnish men in their 60s and 70% of women had reported sleep disturbances in the previous month.

From the results of the two studies, the researchers were able to distinguish four different factors or components associated with stress: physical workload and shift work, psychosocial workload, non-work-related social and environmental adversity, and life and/or non-health related events. the adversity of work.

As psychology professor and co-author of the study, Marianna Virtanen Ph.D. explains in a press release, “The more work and non-work stressors an employee had, the more sleep problems they also had. .”

The researchers also note that different types of stress impact sleep in different ways. Work-related stress, for example, was linked to persistent sleep problems, while non-work-related stress predicted more sleep problems in the future. Working conditions were also associated with sleep quality, and you guessed it: poor working conditions meant poor quality sleep.

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Why do I feel tired after working all day at my desk? https://indigodreams.net/why-do-i-feel-tired-after-working-all-day-at-my-desk/ Sat, 13 Aug 2022 17:07:33 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/why-do-i-feel-tired-after-working-all-day-at-my-desk/ Do you always feel exhausted at the end of the working day – even if you’ve only sat down at a desk? It turns out that mental focus leads to changes in the brain that can really wear us out, researchers from Pitie-Salpetriere University in France have found. When we perform intense mental work over […]]]>

Do you always feel exhausted at the end of the working day – even if you’ve only sat down at a desk?

It turns out that mental focus leads to changes in the brain that can really wear us out, researchers from Pitie-Salpetriere University in France have found.

When we perform intense mental work over several hours, potentially toxic byproducts can build up in the brain’s prefrontal cortex, the study found. The result? This feeling of mental fatigue sets in.

Have you ever felt irrational and grumpy after hours spent focusing on work tasks? Well, that could be why. Research has found that this process can impair our control over decisions, so we turn to actions that require no effort or waiting. Essentially, the brain begins to shut down.

Yes, concentrating can really be exhausting! (Alamy/AP)

“All of this science simply means that thinking intensely for prolonged periods leads to mental exhaustion and disruption of executive functioning needed to plan and make decisions,” says leadership and mental health expert Ngozi Cadmus. “Fatigue thus becomes an inevitable consequence of using so much mental power.”

Not only is this mental exhaustion a problem in itself, but these things can have a wider impact. As Cadmus notes, “Prolonged exhaustion can lead to difficulty in a person’s daily life, impact relationships and daily activities, and inhibit normal functioning.”

So what can we do to help fight it?

Prioritize rest

In our productivity-obsessed world, making downtime a priority is vital. “If regular rest isn’t built into a person’s daily structure, it can disrupt brain function,” Cadmus says. “Therefore, rest is essential to allow proper regulation of [the neurotransmitter] glutamate to its normal levels.

Look for variety

Paula Allen, Senior Vice President of Research and Total Wellness at LifeWorks (lifeworks.com/en), says doing the same tasks for hours on end can exhaust our brains.

“The mere lack of variety in our daily routine is in itself a mental strain, which many do not recognize. We need a balanced ‘diet’ for our brain as much as we need it nutritionally,” says Allen, who says we need “experiences that provide pleasure, fulfillment, connection with others, movement and disorientation. We feel excessively tired and more irritable when our range of mental stimulation is too narrow.

“When working from home, many employees also lose structural cues present in the office, such as scheduled meetings and lunch breaks. For some, that means the breaks never happen. For others, it affects the ability to focus on a task within a limited time frame, as one hour fades into the next.

“It’s important to listen to our body. If you find that a task you used to do seamlessly in the workplace now feels like a chore, then it’s time to take a break.

Have a consistent nighttime routine

A good nighttime routine helps (Alamy/PA)

For Cadmus, getting “a minimum of eight hours of sleep per night is important” to balance mental exhaustion.

Allen agrees: “Sleep is a major factor in physical and mental well-being, and a current risk factor. Our Mental Health Index found that 40% of Britons want to improve their sleep, demonstrating the need to tackle mental stress and provide information on general sleep hygiene as part of their support and solutions of well-being. »

Take regular breaks from the office

In addition to your main rest time and lunch break, regular short breaks from your workstation can make a big difference. Chances are you’ll be more efficient and productive overall.

“Take a step back, pay attention to your limits and communicate how you feel to your manager. Communication and problem solving between employers and employees is critical and becomes even more important as we navigate the post-pandemic world of work,” Allen advises.

Cadmus also points out that “regular exercise” is good for the brain and stress levels. So why not go for a lunchtime run or workout, or go out for a short walk?

Stay hydrated

Hydration is key to staying alert (Alamy/PA)

Dehydration makes us all groggy and more tired, so be sure to drink enough water throughout the day. If mental fatigue bothers you, consider cutting back on caffeine and alcohol as well, Cadmus advises. This will help alleviate the stress your brain is under.

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