Sleep Difficulties – Indigo Dreams http://indigodreams.net/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 20:59:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://indigodreams.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1.png Sleep Difficulties – Indigo Dreams http://indigodreams.net/ 32 32 Family of ‘adorable’ girl, 2, who died after vomiting while sleeping, say doctors failed https://indigodreams.net/family-of-adorable-girl-2-who-died-after-vomiting-while-sleeping-say-doctors-failed/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 19:21:31 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/family-of-adorable-girl-2-who-died-after-vomiting-while-sleeping-say-doctors-failed/ Grieving parents of “adorable” two-year-old daughter say they were rejected by doctors after learning she was in stable condition despite not responding for hours and appeared to be throwing up in her body. sleep. An investigation revealed that Cristiana Banciu’s mother and father had “probably not” received the correct clinical picture from a nurse when […]]]>

Grieving parents of “adorable” two-year-old daughter say they were rejected by doctors after learning she was in stable condition despite not responding for hours and appeared to be throwing up in her body. sleep.

An investigation revealed that Cristiana Banciu’s mother and father had “probably not” received the correct clinical picture from a nurse when she informed them of the child’s condition just before she was discharged. taken to another hospital where doctors quickly concluded that she had little chance of survival.

She was about a month away from her third birthday when she died at King’s College Hospital in Denmark Hill, south London on January 8, 2020.



Cristiana’s father, Alexandru, described his daughter as a “beautiful, smiling and adorable girl”

She had been transferred from Princess Royal University Hospital in Orpington two days earlier, on January 6.

According to a post-mortem examination cited in a serious incident investigation report from King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, she died of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS).

Cristiana’s father, Alexandru, described his daughter as a “beautiful, smiling and adorable daughter”.

She had been “perfect” on January 4, but woke up in the early hours of January 5 with a temperature, he told the South London Coroner’s Court investigation.

When her fever did not subside, they took her to Princess Royal University Hospital, just a five-minute drive from their home in Orpington.

After chest x-rays, the child was sent home with medication, with staff saying she appeared to have an early lung infection, her mother Georgina Banciu said.

The court heard that the two-year-old girl had previously had problems with a lower respiratory tract infection, but Ms Banciu said her condition that day was “very different”.

When she failed to improve at home, her parents took her back to the emergency room and she was admitted to a pediatric ward.

Speaking through an interpreter, Ms Banciu, originally from Romania, said despite her daughter’s vomiting “no doctor came to see her”.

Mr Banciu said it was “very confusing for us as parents because she did not wake up” when she threw up, but added that they were not immediately worried because “no one put us on alert “.

He said they “didn’t know it was wrong” and attributed his lack of reaction to the medication he was given.

He said they alerted a member of staff and the sheets had been changed but no further action had been taken.

When the child vomited again, Ms Banciu said that a nurse told her the doctor could not come because he was going to the emergency room.

When her daughter got sick a third time and had traces of blood, her mother said, “That’s when I got mad and said ‘this is not vomiting, this is the time. ‘is blood’.

Staff nurse Radmila Bartule told the inquest that she had raised concerns with other staff about the child vomiting as he appeared to be sleeping.

She also insisted that she called a doctor when she had a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) check-up and that they “didn’t seem to care, so it reassured me that nothing was wrong. does not happen ”.

Investigation revealed Cristiana had a “dangerously low” GCS of 8 when she first joined the ward.

Just before the child was transferred to King’s College Hospital, Ms Bartule said she told them their daughter was “cased and stable”.

Assistant Coroner Jacqueline Devonish said, “So you’re talking to the parents who brought in a child who earlier today was alive and the day before had been lively and chatty.

“So they brought this child who has been sleeping or has been unconscious for hours. They sat down next to the bed, we didn’t say anything at all. The first thing they are told is that it is stable, ready for the transfer. Was this really the clinical picture? “

In tears, the nurse replied, “Probably not.”



Princess Royal University Hospital in Orpington
Princess Royal University Hospital in Orpington

At the end of her testimony, Ms. Bartule said: “May I just say that I am very sorry for their loss. Honestly, I’m so sorry if I did something that I could have done better.

The parents traveled with their daughter in the ambulance to King’s College and Mr Banciu said it was the first time he had been told about the “real situation” she found herself in.

He said a doctor told them, “I’m doing my best to get your daughter to at least assure me that she gets to Denmark Hill.

Concluding his testimony at the inquest, he added, “Whatever I can do to make sure this doesn’t happen to any other parent because no one deserves it.”

Ms Banciu said upon arrival at King’s College Hospital, staff “did all they could” but were told their daughter had less than a 0.1% chance of survival .

The deputy coroner described it as a “devastating” and “very, very sad” case.

The inquest has been adjourned to hear further testimony on a date to be fixed.

Jodi Newton, attorney at Osbornes Law, who represents the family, said: “The family is heartbroken and determined to find long-awaited answers, which we hope the investigation will achieve.

“Nothing will bring their beautiful daughter back, but they hope that with a thorough investigation, answers and a meaningful change plan, other parents can avoid the tragedy they have experienced.”



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Overdue bills, no work: people in need of welfare get help from congregation members in Japan https://indigodreams.net/overdue-bills-no-work-people-in-need-of-welfare-get-help-from-congregation-members-in-japan/ Thu, 03 Jun 2021 22:33:09 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/overdue-bills-no-work-people-in-need-of-welfare-get-help-from-congregation-members-in-japan/ Shuhei Ogura, left, Assembly member from Adachi district, discusses livelihood reconstruction with a woman from Nakano district, Tokyo, April 19, 2021 (Mainichi / Satoshi Tokairin) TOKYO – Faced with calls from the government to expand its economic support measures in the wake of the spread of the coronavirus, Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga told the Diet: […]]]>

Shuhei Ogura, left, Assembly member from Adachi district, discusses livelihood reconstruction with a woman from Nakano district, Tokyo, April 19, 2021 (Mainichi / Satoshi Tokairin)

TOKYO – Faced with calls from the government to expand its economic support measures in the wake of the spread of the coronavirus, Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga told the Diet: “At the end of the day, we have well-being.” However, the truth is that people cannot always immediately receive public aid at their local government office.

Aware of the hardships some people face, Shuhei Ogura, 47, a congregation member from Tokyo’s Adachi district, has been helping people in need seek social assistance and rebuild their lives for over a decade. His point of view is that “poverty is never your fault”.

Since last spring, there has been an increase in the number of times he has accompanied people to the ward office asking for public help. Ogura has formed a group of like-minded local assembly members and is expanding his circle of support.

One of the people Ogura accompanied to the Adachi neighborhood office who was able to benefit from public assistance was a woman in her thirties. The woman is from the Shinetsu area and lived in a rented apartment in Chiba Prefecture, but lost her home when she became absorbed in her hobby and did not pay her rent.

She also couldn’t make calls on her smartphone due to unpaid bills, but she didn’t give up her phone because she could use the free LINE communication app to contact her acquaintances in places where the Free wi-fi was available, as was at nearby convenience stores.

For more than three years, she had worked in a “bar for girls”, where the staff are mostly women, in Tokyo, while sleeping in an internet cafe. However, due to the effects of the coronavirus pandemic, the bar’s opening hours have been shortened and its revenue has been cut to less than half. In August 2020, she “voluntarily resigned” because it was becoming difficult for her to work there since the bar had to carefully check not only her age but her home in case of infection.

Her savings quickly ran out, and she had to borrow repeatedly from money lending companies and others. At the end of March of this year, when she had only 1,000 yen (about $ 9) in her pocket and could no longer stay in an internet cafe, she sent an email to an organization that supports the needy, asking for ugly. She recalls: “I contacted them thinking, ‘If that doesn’t work, I might as well die. “It was Ogura who came to his aid.



This screenshot shows an online study session held on April 5, 2021, with guest speakers supporting those in need. The second person from the left in the top row is Shuhei Ogura, assembly member from Adachi Parish in Tokyo. (Photo courtesy of Shuhei Ogura)

Ogura gave her the necessary money the support group had prepared as an emergency loan and guaranteed her a place to stay. Later, she successfully received public assistance in the Adachi district, obtained a new certificate of residence, and found an apartment to live there.

The Mainichi Shimbun asked the woman what she would like to do when she can live in the apartment. The answer was: “I would like to cook, because Internet cafes do not have a kitchen. I only ate noodles and rice balls. She had never been able to cook due to her situation, although she was good at it.

The woman, who can once again stand in a kitchen, expressed her gratitude to Ogura. “I couldn’t understand half of the explanations given to the parish office, and I think I would have given up on asking for public aid on my own,” she said. “I want to rebuild my life from now on.”

When people ask for public assistance, the response from the welfare office, which is the point of contact for local government, is often a problem. In some cases, welfare offices fail to respond to requests from the needy, forcing them to go to the local government office where their residence is registered or to seek employment. Among those who work to help the needy, this tactic of the welfare offices of sending applicants out the door is known as a “shore operation”.

Accompanying people when they apply for public assistance is not only a way to avoid such ‘shore operations’, but can help them receive additional support to rebuild their lives afterwards, such as preparing a certificate of residence, find an apartment, and receive Support.

The assembly member stressed that “basically anyone should be able to apply for public aid smoothly on their own, without needing someone to accompany them.” He added: “There are cases where it is difficult to follow the procedures, which include re-obtaining a certificate of residence. There is a need for someone to work with them and advise them on the procedures.”

Ogura began providing full-fledged support to people seeking public aid around 2007, when he was in his first term as a member of the Adachi Parish Assembly. He says he started this activity as a result of his night patrol activities to support people who lived on the streets when he was a student.

Ogura graduated from college in the 1990s, during Japan’s “employment ice age”, when young people struggled to find jobs due to the collapse of the economic “bubble”. Unable to find a full-time job, once Ogura became a temporary worker, and another time took a day job in Kamagasaki, Osaka, an area known for its day laborers. Seeing “old men”, who had no choice but to sleep under the stars, working hard for a living, he began to aspire to a career in politics.

“I think the role of politics is to look at the reality of those who cannot speak out and act accordingly. We have to change the social system while solving the real problems,” Ogura said.

Members of local assemblies are the politicians that citizens know best. However, there are different ways of thinking among them. Some go so far as to view social assistance as “a shame,” while others focus on supporting the needy. Ogura called on Kaoru Katayama, 54, a member of the Koganei City Assembly, Tokyo, and others to form the “Association of Local Assembly Members for Coronavirus Disaster Countermeasures” in April of last year.

Currently, the association has around 200 members, mainly in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Ogura said: “I think members of the assembly who thought their supporters had no connection with public assistance could no longer remain indifferent to the spread of the coronavirus.”

Some members of the association apparently have little or no experience in supporting people seeking public aid. Ogura explained, “Asking for public aid is a matter of life and death for those in need” and he organized two online study sessions for members to experience the practical work and put it into practice with social workers from local government. He says he plans to continue learning about court cases and social conditions related to public assistance.



Sachiyo Ikeda, member of the municipal assembly of Komagane, Nagano prefecture, sees this photo taken by Chieko Yusa. (Photo courtesy of Sachiyo Ikeda)

The Tokyo metropolitan area is not alone in having such a network of local assembly members. In April last year, Sachiyo Ikeda, 49, a member of the Komagane Municipal Assembly in Nagano Prefecture, created a network of local government assembly members to help people in regional areas to receive public support, by naming the group “Local Safety Network”.

“In rural areas, people in need are isolated and neglected, and there are far fewer places where women, in particular, can seek advice or seek help if they need help winning. their life or because of work problems. Ikeda said.

The network currently has about sixty members and its Facebook page participates in their activities. On the Ikeda page created under the name of the network, it displays the names and contact details of the members of the assembly who have offered to lend a hand, so that those in need can consult them.

When a welfare recipient consulted Ikeda about being forced out of her apartment and having no money, the lawyer and social worker, who were old acquaintances of hers, asked researched in detail the precedents and past opinions, and finally the beneficiary was able to move. safely after securing the moving expenses.

Ikeda also formed the “Nagano Branch Kamiina General Union”, a union which individuals can join, as well as members of the local assembly who are active in the same area. The reason was that she had learned that many workers had no way of dealing with issues such as unpaid wages, layoffs and the inability to claim workers’ compensation insurance.

Some people questioned his activities, saying, “Is this the work of a member of a municipal assembly? But Ikeda doesn’t flinch, responding, “It’s the job of a member of a local assembly. It is preferable that the members of the assembly get involved in local work, daily life and legal consultations with the help of experts. From there we can gain a real understanding of how local people live and work, and what issues need to be addressed. ”

(Japanese original by Satoshi Tokairin, Tokyo City Public Information Department)



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the sense of mental health ‘blah blah’ during COVID lockdowns https://indigodreams.net/the-sense-of-mental-health-blah-blah-during-covid-lockdowns/ Wed, 02 Jun 2021 06:09:16 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/the-sense-of-mental-health-blah-blah-during-covid-lockdowns/ In a disconnected pandemic world, many of us feel a little ‘meh’ about life. Here is an expert take on how to escape that feeling. It’s safe to say that the global pandemic that brought the world to a screeching halt has left us all a little intoxicated. Even in an Australia primarily safe for […]]]>

In a disconnected pandemic world, many of us feel a little ‘meh’ about life. Here is an expert take on how to escape that feeling.

It’s safe to say that the global pandemic that brought the world to a screeching halt has left us all a little intoxicated.

Even in an Australia primarily safe for COVID, fear of lockdowns, restrictions on gatherings and socializing have always made their presence known – and continue to cast uncertainty on our community.

The New York Times recently published an article about this feeling – neither happy nor sad, but just a little “blah” – called languid.

Like what you see? Subscribe to our newsletter bodyandsoul.com.au for more stories like this.

Speaking on Body + Soul’s Daily Podcast Healthy-ish, Dr. Frank Chow, psychiatrist and director of 2OP Health, says that “languishing” is the state before burnout.

“A lot of the symptoms and languid signs that we have been exposed to include cloudy thinking, lack of motivation, some people have trouble concentrating, especially sitting in front of computers, have a feeling of sluggishness and a lack of energy. , ”He tells host Felicity Harley in the episode Healthy-ish This “blah” you feel … it’s called languishing. Here’s how to cope.

Dr Chow says it’s very different from burnout where you experience more physical symptoms such as trouble sleeping and even different from depression which is much more of a serious slowing down of your mental state.

He explains that languor is an early symptom of a potential mental health disorder, and if left untreated it can escalate into something much worse, such as depression, anxiety, and exhaustion. professional.

Dr Chow adds that the disconnect between people during the pandemic is partly responsible for why we all feel so ‘blah’.

“We have a heard community where we follow others. We have leaders at the top that we follow, and we watch how each other behaves and we mimic the behavior of others, ”he says.

“So we’re sitting at home with a feeling of; “What is going on in the world? “,” Am I doing the right thing or am I doing the wrong thing? “,” Am I alone here? And ‘am I still in a band?’ “

“So that feeling of uncertainty in the world combined with all this news… talking about a pandemic… you know, it creates a feeling of anxiety.”

Without social interaction and so much uncertainty about our future, we are brought to a kind of stop where there is no forward or backward. We ‘languish’ in this ‘blah’ feeling with very little direction.

The anxiety that sets in about this can be conscious or unconscious, says Dr. Chow.

“A lot of times it becomes a subconscious level of anxiety and it creeps into our mind… creating that feeling of uncertainty around us. I think that’s why we develop this feeling of “languishing,” he says.

The opposite of languishing is flourishing – which is a pretty self-explanatory term. Dr Chow says that if we can be aware of ourselves as we go from blossoming to languishing, we can try to learn some tactics on our own to get out of it.

These tactics include:

  • Spending social time with family friends and loved ones rather than home alone
  • Investing in hobbies and crafts that add joy, satisfaction, and a sense of connection to our lives
  • Seek to clarify your “why”. Make sure that the goals you have are still what you want and that they are not the result of parental influence or peer pressure. Having a goal that you are truly passionate about will help you stay motivated
  • Celebrate the small victories and every milestone
  • If you live in a place where you can take a change of pace, consider taking annual leave or trying a new restaurant.
  • If you can’t due to the pandemic, try redesigning your home to feel fresh and new. It will help you feel a sense of satisfaction and accomplishment

If you’re unaware of what’s going on and how your feelings are changing, or your tactics aren’t working and you’re still sliding into languishing, maybe it’s time to seek professional help. .

“I think it’s good to start using strategies to help you deal with some of these feelings (like above). It boils down to when it manifests as feelings that you cannot handle or resolve or if it has become a physical manifestation and symptoms such as difficulty sleeping or waking up without feeling rested, ”says Dr. Chow.

There are many versions of extreme physical manifestations, including not getting enough sleep, wanting to sleep all the time, eating too little, or gorging on comfort food.

“With that kind of behavior… you should start talking to someone because the strategy you have… doesn’t work anymore. And if you let it continue, it can snowball into bigger problems. “

So for anyone who feels “meh” out there. Know that you are not alone and that there are both strategies and therapists who have the resources to help you thrive.

So much for that.

In case of emergency, please call 000.

If you or someone you know needs help, call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or the 24 hour Suicide Reminder Service on 1300 659 467.

Mental health professionals are available 24/7 at the beyondblue helpdesk – 1300 22 46 36 or via beyondblue.org.au/get-support for an online chat (3:00 p.m.- 12:00 p.m. AEST) or an email response.



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BRHS graduates reflect on their first year of college amid pandemic https://indigodreams.net/brhs-graduates-reflect-on-their-first-year-of-college-amid-pandemic/ Tue, 01 Jun 2021 11:45:00 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/brhs-graduates-reflect-on-their-first-year-of-college-amid-pandemic/ It wasn’t like that it was supposed to be. It was the thought in Ally Nein’s head as she walked out of her childhood bedroom to tell her mother that she had completed her freshman year in college. Nein had spent just three months at his “dream school,” Wheaton College in Massachusetts, before a COVID-19 […]]]>

It wasn’t like that it was supposed to be.

It was the thought in Ally Nein’s head as she walked out of her childhood bedroom to tell her mother that she had completed her freshman year in college. Nein had spent just three months at his “dream school,” Wheaton College in Massachusetts, before a COVID-19 outbreak in November shut down already limited facilities on campus. When the students had the opportunity to return home, Nein and his roommate, Boothbay Region High School (BRHS) graduate Maddy Faulkingham, decided to complete the year remotely.

Nein and Faulkingham are two of the thousands of freshmen whose high school has abruptly moved away due to the pandemic. “I left on a Friday and never been back, and it was really hard for me because I’m super sentimental,” said Nein. “It didn’t look like a closure. I didn’t feel like I was done.

As the pandemic continued, the students discovered that their university experiences were not what they had envisioned either. Nein and other former BRHS students said it contributed to a similar sense of lack of closure.

“It wasn’t really a warm welcome from the faculty, it wasn’t really a warm welcome from anywhere. It was just rushed and lazy and people didn’t want to do much, ”said Ben Rumney. Rumney remained on campus for the two semesters at the University of Maine at Orono, a decision he now regrets.

Rumney explained, he decided to stay on campus his second semester, so he could get one-on-one help from professors and because the college had hinted that tuition would be reduced to reflect reduced facilities and costs. activities. It was too late to leave campus life when he realized that teachers would not be available in person and tuition would not be reduced.

“There were a lot of promises made and a lot of promises failed. It kind of made me lose faith in college, ”Rumney said.

The Boothbay Register has solicited UMaine’s comments on Rumney’s experience.

Rowan Kristan, who attends Maine Maritime Academy, was eager to travel. He hoped to participate in his school’s touring boat team to compete with other maritime schools in New England and New York. The event has been canceled.

“When I thought of college, I thought of friends, sports and clubs and literally being in a classroom,” Nein said. “And I really didn’t have any of that.”

The lack of activities also made socialization difficult. Students feared they would get sick or spread the coronavirus. Rumney also said that students at his school who were caught partying were fined or expelled. However, having to limit close contact has helped some students become friends with people in their dorms.

At Syracuse University, Hali Goodwin lived with other engineering majors, which made studying “really easy”.

Nonetheless, the mundane daily schedule took its toll on the mental health of the students. “I can easily go my entire semester waking up, going to class, having food, coming back, studying, falling asleep,” Rumney said. “Rinse and repeat. It’s very sad that this is what it was.

Rumney’s first roommate returned home due to the circumstances. Her second roommate almost did.

Nein and Faulkingham also reported increased mental distress during their first semester and improvement upon their return home.

These experiences are part of a national trend; “95% of students experienced negative mental health symptoms due to circumstances related to COVID-19”, according to a BestColleges.com survey. Almost half of the participants believe that the effects on mental health also affected their education.

“It was difficult to have constant academic pressure without interrupting social and other events,” Goodwin said. “It’s been tough on the mental health of many students, especially those of us in engineering with really tough classes.”

Rumney recalled that he and his friends wondered if they were “stupid” for not keeping the information in their online lessons. Most BRHS alumni interviewed said they were unprepared for online college courses because when they left remotely most classes were canceled or they worked independently.

However, the students tried to supplement their studies where they could. Faulkingham, who is majoring in biology with a pre-veterinary medicine track, worked at Boothbay Animal Hospital during his second semester. She said the experience helped make up for the lab work she missed being at a distance. Nein, a double major in psychology and early childhood education, accepted a job at the YMCA daycare.

“I learned so much in the few months I worked there and I am very grateful for this experience. I think everything happens for a reason and I kind of took a shitty situation and made it as positive as I could, ”Nein said.

Despite the struggles of their freshman year, students are eager to return to a more open campus as COVID-19 restrictions continue to be lifted.

“I really hope that by next semester things will get back to normal, and we hope we don’t have to wear masks on campus and that clubs and activities are back up and running,” he said. said Goodwin. “I am delighted to get more involved in campus life.”



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Closures of closed schools in Covid “hurt mothers’ mental health but did not affect fathers” | Mental Health https://indigodreams.net/closures-of-closed-schools-in-covid-hurt-mothers-mental-health-but-did-not-affect-fathers-mental-health/ Mon, 31 May 2021 13:24:21 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/closures-of-closed-schools-in-covid-hurt-mothers-mental-health-but-did-not-affect-fathers-mental-health/ School closures in England during the Covid lockdown severely damaged the mental health of mothers but had no impact on the well-being of fathers, research shows. Childcare and home schooling as well as their own work have made more mothers of preteen children feel depressed, have trouble sleeping and see themselves as worthless. The pandemic […]]]>

School closures in England during the Covid lockdown severely damaged the mental health of mothers but had no impact on the well-being of fathers, research shows.

Childcare and home schooling as well as their own work have made more mothers of preteen children feel depressed, have trouble sleeping and see themselves as worthless.

The pandemic has increased mental health problems among parents in general. However, mothers were affected the most, with fathers barely affected, according to the study.

Closing schools to stop the spread of the coronavirus has had “a significant detrimental effect” on the mental health of mothers, academics from the universities of Essex, Surrey and Birmingham have said. However, “for fathers it made no difference.”

The findings are based on a study of how 1,500 parents of children aged 4 to 12 in England mentally coped with the school closures that accompanied the first lockdown, which began in March 2020. Back to school school at the beginning of June – primary students in reception and in first and sixth year – and those whose offspring did not return until September.

Mothers whose sons and daughters missed the entire summer term were the most affected. Their responses to 12 questions of the General Health Questionnaire, an established way to measure mental well-being, showed a significant drop from before the start of the pandemic.

The researchers found that mothers with at least one child who was not in the priority age groups to return to school last June “are more likely to report losing more sleep worrying, feeling constantly under tension; feeling that they cannot overcome their difficulties; [and] feeling miserable or depressed ”, they say in a report for the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Essex.

Other effects include that women lose self-confidence, see themselves as worthless, and feel unable to enjoy their normal daily activities.

“The impact of children’s out-of-school education on the mental health of mothers is considerable and represents a significant hidden cost of confinement. Our study shows – for the first time – the pressure of school closings on the mental health of mothers, ”said Dr Laura Fumagalli, researcher at ISER and one of the four co-authors of the report.

“We estimate that school closures could be responsible for about half of the decline in maternal mental health during the pandemic. It is striking that, on average, the mental health of fathers does not appear to be affected by school closures, ”she added.

The authors identified a sharp increase in loneliness, social isolation and loss of contact with peers in and out of school as the main trigger for declining mothers’ mental health. It was more important than having to work overtime or losing a job, they found.

Mothers whose children were not given priority to return to school were more likely to report feeling lonely than those whose children returned in June.

The results are consistent with Previous search showing that women in general, and mothers living with young children in particular, were among the groups that suffered increased mental distress during the pandemic, as were people with poor underlying health, those from low-income households and people of Asian descent. This is the latest study to find that men’s mental health has remained largely unchanged.

“The results of this study are extremely worrying. Incredible parents, especially mothers who have disproportionately taken on the colossal burden of juggling home schooling and work during the pandemic, are physically and mentally exhausted, ”said Liberal Democrat MP Munira Wilson, spokesperson. word of his party for health, welfare and social care.

“Maternal mental health has suffered badly as a result of multiple lockdowns, and poor government support just hasn’t helped matters.

“Their botched reopening of schools, in which they failed to address parents’ concerns about unclear and inconsistent advice, is just one example of how the government has completely let mothers down. during a time of great distress.

“Moms must feel like they’ve had the rug swept from underneath them. The next public inquiry into the management of the pandemic must examine as a priority its impact on mental health, ”Wilson added.

Data on the 1,500 parents in the study came from Understanding Society, the UK longitudinal study, and was collected in April, May, June, July, September and November of last year.



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Carey Price saved his best hockey for the playoffs https://indigodreams.net/carey-price-saved-his-best-hockey-for-the-playoffs/ Sun, 30 May 2021 15:05:16 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/carey-price-saved-his-best-hockey-for-the-playoffs/ Eat this, not that! These McDonald’s super-fans turned their home into a sanctuary A couple from Virginia have a distinct love for preservation as their nostalgic, fast food and pop culture themed home has gone viral in international media. And you thought you were excited about the Golden Arches – these two have a vintage […]]]>

Eat this, not that!

These McDonald’s super-fans turned their home into a sanctuary

A couple from Virginia have a distinct love for preservation as their nostalgic, fast food and pop culture themed home has gone viral in international media. And you thought you were excited about the Golden Arches – these two have a vintage McDonald’s sign hanging on a wall painted “McDonald’s in red”! Taylor and Adam Gecking have a very large scale of flares. The Richmond, Va. Couple collect fast food memorabilia, but this isn’t a little box of old Happy Meal toys. In fact, their entire house is a museum of old-time McDonald’s artifacts and other memorable snacks.RELATED: 7 New Fast Food Chicken Sandwiches Everyone’s Talking About As Metro UK reported on Friday, Taylor Gecking’s massive renovation of McDonald’s home began with a treasure she found in an antique dealer. “My husband and I stopped at a flea market on a road trip and saw Ronald McDonald’s stained glass window,” Gecking said. “I was inexplicably drawn to it… I walked away from it that day, but a year later, as we were driving around the same neighborhood, I asked him to stop at the flea market so that I could can see if [the piece] was still there. “The price hadn’t budged, but, seeing how much she loved the window, her husband” surprised her with the kitsch artwork the next day – after driving eight hours round trip in West Virginia to buy it for, ”reports Metro UK. This sparked a quest for more universally appetizing gems, and the Geckings completed renovations to their home during the pandemic. This made the Gecking House a true 1970s and 1980s sanctuary, complete with a statue of the Kool -Aid Man, an original 1970s McDonald’s sign bearing the Golden Arches, an old department store carousel and McDonald’s curtains. Taylor Gecking, whose Facebook page reveals to be a professional embalmer and funeral director, revealed her husband doesn’t quite share the same love of classic fast food. “Adam doesn’t have any nostalgia for McDonald’s, in fact he’s a vegan, but he’s always as excited as I am when we find a McDonald’s item because he knows how happy it makes me.” She added that he “didn’t flinch when I told her I painted the entire McDonald’s stairwell red with McDonald’s yellow trim. We love that our house reflects back to us.” As to what Gecking said. Next, she says she’s hoping for a bench with a statue of Ronald McDonald perched on it. us here to check out the 9 nostalgic snack brands that are launching new treats for summer. Also Read: This One McDonald’s Menu Hack Will Get You The Freshest Fries, Customers Say 15 Popular McDonald’s Menu Items That Left For GoodWill Smith Just Shared His Weight Loss Progress In New Video Post



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QIAGEN Launches First FDA-Approved Tissue Companion Diagnosis to Identify KRAS G12C Mutation in NSCLC Tumors and Expand Precision Medicine Options in Lung Cancer https://indigodreams.net/qiagen-launches-first-fda-approved-tissue-companion-diagnosis-to-identify-kras-g12c-mutation-in-nsclc-tumors-and-expand-precision-medicine-options-in-lung-cancer/ Fri, 28 May 2021 20:25:48 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/qiagen-launches-first-fda-approved-tissue-companion-diagnosis-to-identify-kras-g12c-mutation-in-nsclc-tumors-and-expand-precision-medicine-options-in-lung-cancer/ GERMANTOWN, Md. & HILDEN, Germany – (BUSINESS WIRE) – QIAGEN NV (NYSE: QGEN; Frankfurt Prime Standard: QIA) today announced the launch of an expanded companion diagnostic (CDx) claims lineup for the therascreen® KRAS RGQ PCR Kit (therascreen KRAS Kit) after receiving regulatory approval from the United States as a companion diagnostic to aid in the […]]]>
GERMANTOWN, Md. & HILDEN, Germany – (BUSINESS WIRE) – QIAGEN NV (NYSE: QGEN; Frankfurt Prime Standard: QIA) today announced the launch of an expanded companion diagnostic (CDx) claims lineup for the therascreen® KRAS RGQ PCR Kit (therascreen KRAS Kit) after receiving regulatory approval from the United States as a companion diagnostic to aid in the identification of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who may be eligible for treatment with LUMAKRASTM (sotorasib), a newly approved therapy developed and marketed by Amgen Inc. (AMGN).

the therascreen The KRAS Kit is the first companion diagnostic test to obtain pre-market approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use to identify the KRAS G12C mutation in NSCLC tumor tissue samples. KRAS is one of the most common mutations in this form of cancer and is estimated to be present in up to 13% of cases of the disease. So far KRAS G12C has not been exploitable, and in fact, has only previously been linked to resistance to therapy. The Qualitative Real-Time PCR Kit is used with the Rotor-Gene Q MDx instrument, a member of the modular family of QIAsymphony automation solutions, and builds on QIAGEN’s nine years of experience in KRAS Development and marketing of CDx tests.

“We are pleased to announce this significant extension of the scope of FDA-approved CDx claims for the therascreen KRAS Kit, ”said Jean-Pascal Viola, senior vice president and head of the Molecular Diagnostics business line at QIAGEN. “This new approval further expands our position as market leader therascreen range of companion diagnostic tests, and illustrates our determination to support the delivery of the latest innovations in precision healthcare to patients with NSCLC, for whom any new treatment option is extremely welcome.

“With advances in precision medicine, biomarker testing is essential for patients with non-small cell lung cancer because it provides information on treatment options during their disease. It is important for patients and their health care providers to know that KRAS G12C is now a workable mutation and start testing it, ”said Darryl Sleep, MD, medical director and senior vice president of Global Medical at Amgen. “With the approval of QIAGEN’s companion diagnostic for LUMAKRAS, patients and clinicians will have more options and flexibility for biomarker testing.”

Up to 13% of patients with NSCLC may have KRAS Tumors positive for G12C and therefore potentially eligible for treatment with LUMAKRASTM. To speed up the identification of these patients, following FDA approval of this test, QIAGEN is performing NSCLC tumor tissue sample testing with the therascreen KRAS Kit available immediately in major laboratories across the United States through QIAGEN’s Day-One Lab Readiness Program for Precision Medicine.

By QIAGEN therascreen The KRAS Kit was used to support the CodeBreaK 100 clinical trial for sotorasib and the expansion of the kit’s CDx claims to include identification of the KRAS The G12C mutation in NSCLC samples has been co-approved with LUMAKRAS by the FDA. The drug Amgen is a new inhibitor of the G12C mutated form of the KRAS (Kirsten’s rat sarcoma) protein, and is the first drug in its class to be approved for the treatment of this form of cancer. Further details on the Kit are available at www.qiagen.com/KRAS.

QIAGEN’s Day-One Lab Readiness program builds on the FDA’s modern regulatory approach to benefit patients by accelerating the launch of advanced diagnostics. An updated list of US laboratories offering NSCLC sample analyzes for the KRAS G12C mutation using therascreen The KRAS test is available at www.qiagen.com/KRAS-lab-finder.

QIAGEN is a pioneer in precision medicine and the global leader in collaborations with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to co-develop companion diagnostics, which detect clinically relevant genetic abnormalities to provide information that guides clinical decision-making in diseases. such as cancer. QIAGEN has unparalleled depth and breadth of technologies ranging from Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for the development of companion diagnostics. QIAGEN now has ten companion PCR-based diagnostic indications that are approved by the FDA, including therascreen EGFR for non-small cell lung cancer, therascreen KRAS for colorectal cancer, therascreen FGFR for urothelial cancer, therascreen PIK3CA for breast cancer based on tissue or plasma samples and therascreen BRAF Kit for Colorectal Cancer.

Currently, QIAGEN is working through collaborative framework agreements with more than 25 companies to develop and commercialize companion diagnostic tests for their drug candidates – a vast pipeline of potential future products to advance precision medicine for the benefit of patients. the therascreen Co-approval of the KRAS kit with LUMAKRASTM marks the tenth FDA approval of a therapy associated with a QIAGEN companion diagnostic test.

About QIAGEN

QIAGEN NV, a Netherlands-based holding company, is the world’s leading provider of Sample to Insight solutions that enable customers to gain valuable molecular information from samples containing the building blocks of life. Our sampling technologies isolate and process DNA, RNA and proteins from blood, tissues and other materials. Assay technologies make these biomolecules visible and ready for analysis. Bioinformatics software and knowledge bases interpret data to yield relevant and actionable information. Automation solutions combine them into transparent and cost-effective workflows. QIAGEN provides solutions to more than 500,000 customers worldwide in the areas of molecular diagnostics (human health), applied testing (mainly forensic), pharmacy (pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies) and academia (research in life sciences). As of March 31, 2020, QIAGEN employed approximately 5,700 people at more than 35 locations around the world. You can find more information on http://www.qiagen.com.

Forward-looking statement

Certain statements in this press release may be considered forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the US Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the US Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. . To the extent any of the statements contained herein regarding QIAGEN’s products, collaborative markets, strategy or results of operations, including, without limitation, its expected adjusted net sales and results of adjusted diluted earnings, are forward-looking in nature, these statements are based on current expectations and assumptions which involve a number of uncertainties and risks. These uncertainties and risks include, but are not limited to, the risks associated with managing growth and international operations (including the effects of currency fluctuations, regulatory processes and reliance on logistics), variability operating results and classifications of customers, commercial development of markets for our products to academic, pharmaceutical, applied testing and molecular diagnostic customers; changing relationships with customers, suppliers and strategic partners; competition; rapid or unexpected technological changes; fluctuations in demand for QIAGEN products (including fluctuations due to general economic conditions, level and timing of customer financing, budgets and other factors); our ability to obtain regulatory approval for our products; difficulties in successfully adapting QIAGEN’s products to integrated solutions and producing such products; QIAGEN’s ability to identify and develop new products and to differentiate and protect our products from competitive products; market acceptance of new QIAGEN products and integration of acquired technologies and businesses. For more information, please refer to the discussions in the reports that QIAGEN has filed or provided to the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

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Long Covid? Join the Stellies Research Registry to help you track your symptoms https://indigodreams.net/long-covid-join-the-stellies-research-registry-to-help-you-track-your-symptoms/ Fri, 28 May 2021 16:20:00 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/long-covid-join-the-stellies-research-registry-to-help-you-track-your-symptoms/ Professor Resia Pretorius from the Department of Physiological Sciences at Stellenbosch University talks to Pippa Hudson about the research. Prof Pretorius would like to document your symptoms in a South African online registry. And if you live in the Western Cape, she also wants your blood sample. After acute Covid-19, in some cases recovery can […]]]>

Professor Resia Pretorius from the Department of Physiological Sciences at Stellenbosch University talks to Pippa Hudson about the research.

Prof Pretorius would like to document your symptoms in a South African online registry. And if you live in the Western Cape, she also wants your blood sample.

After acute Covid-19, in some cases recovery can take months as patients continue to struggle with long-term effects and recurring symptoms. It manifests as a collection of persistent symptoms, which last for 90 days or even longer.

Pippa Hudson chats with Resia Pretorius from the Department of Physiological Sciences at Stellenbosch University and Pippa Hudson talks about the research. on current research.

RELATED: Long-Term Effects of Covid on Athletes Begin to Show, Sports Scientist Says

Pretorius says the most common symptoms are recurring episodes of extreme fatigue, muscle weakness, and shortness of breath.

Patients also complain of sleep disturbances, anxiety and depression. Other common complaints are also forgetfulness and difficulty concentrating.

Resia Pretorius, Department of Physiological Sciences – University of Stellenbosch

RELATED: ‘Long Covid Is Post-Viral Fatigue Syndrome Also Seen After Swine And Bird Flu’

RELATED: Do You Think You Have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome? Here is what you need to do

In fact, she says, a recent publication links 150 symptoms to a long Covid.

The Department of Physiological Sciences at Stellenbosch University is tracking symptoms to try to better understand this syndrome.

It sets up an online registry to help track cases.

We are very happy to have this registry online now, to help better understand this disease and determine the long Covid in South Africa.

Resia Pretorius, Department of Physiological Sciences – University of Stellenbosch

She says they have already started studying blood samples from people with long Covid.

Our preliminary data has shown us that some people may suffer from different inflammatory molecules present in their blood.

Resia Pretorius, Department of Physiological Sciences – University of Stellenbosch

Anyone in South Africa can join the registry, but blood samples to help determine an individual’s case will only be available in vineyards in Cape Town and the wider Cape region.

If you would like to support this research effort, please complete the COVID Long Register online here.

Listen to the interview below:


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Frankie review | Film – Empire https://indigodreams.net/frankie-review-film-empire/ Thu, 27 May 2021 15:09:41 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/frankie-review-film-empire/ Sinta, Portugal. Famous French movie star Françoise, aka Frankie, (Isabelle Huppert) invites her family to her beautiful mountainside sanctuary. With relationships all facing their own emotional issues, Frankie has something to tell them. With Love is strange and Little men, Ira Sachs has established himself as a master of small-scale sweets, remarkably observed character dramas, […]]]>

Sinta, Portugal. Famous French movie star Françoise, aka Frankie, (Isabelle Huppert) invites her family to her beautiful mountainside sanctuary. With relationships all facing their own emotional issues, Frankie has something to tell them.

With Love is strange and Little men, Ira Sachs has established himself as a master of small-scale sweets, remarkably observed character dramas, set in New York City, sipped with humor and humanity. Define his last, Frankie, in the sunnier climates of the Portuguese mountain landscapes of Sinta, something got lost in the transatlantic crossing. It’s not that Frankie is bad – he claims strength in acting depth – he just feels dull, especially in light of his previous work.

Frankie is a strangely deaf and overly talkative affair.

Action – or, more accurately, inaction – takes place over a day. Famous French actress Françoise, aka Frankie (Isabelle Huppert), has summoned the intricate pieces of her family to join her, along with her second husband, Jimmy (Brendan Gleeson) in their lavish hillside retreat. The clan includes her son Paul (Jérémie Renier) of first husband Michel (Pascal Greggory), the daughter of Jimmy Sylvia (Vinette Robinson) who is experiencing relationship difficulties with her husband Ian (Ariyon Bakare), and their daughter Maya (Sennia Nenua) who goes alone and meets locals at the beach. The reason for the family reunion is painfully obvious from the start (“This horrible thing makes you lose faith in love itself”) but takes its time to emerge.

Frankie’s makeup artist Ilene (Marisa Tomei), whom Frankie has invited as a potential partner for her son, turns around family, but the plan goes awry when she arrives with her current squeeze Gary (Greg Kinnear), who is oddly a second unit cinematographer on a Star wars filming of films in Spain. There are a few good times – Frankie being dragged into a fan’s 88th birthday party – and one last daring move. But you would expect that, with three generations clashing, sparks will fly – but somehow, Frankie is a strangely muffled, overly talkative affair of characters pondering romantic and relationship mini-dramas like an Eric Rohmer movie about sedatives. Huppert can do this thing while sleeping, there are some good support turns (especially Tomei and Gleeson) and the place is beautiful, but Frankie A slow, thin and surprisingly bland affair emerges.

He has his pleasures but after the nuances and emotional hits of Love Is Strange and Little Men, Frankie is a disappointment. Even the Queen, Isabelle Huppert, cannot raise this one.



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Michiganders navigate disrupted grieving process during COVID-19 https://indigodreams.net/michiganders-navigate-disrupted-grieving-process-during-covid-19/ Thu, 27 May 2021 04:02:49 +0000 https://indigodreams.net/michiganders-navigate-disrupted-grieving-process-during-covid-19/ This article is part of Health, a series on how Michigan communities are mobilizing to address health challenges. It is made possible by funding from the Michigan Health Endowment Fund. For Wyoming, Michigan resident Isabel Romero and her family, COVID-19 has meant great loss while being unable to participate in many traditional mourning rituals. At […]]]>
This article is part of Health, a series on how Michigan communities are mobilizing to address health challenges. It is made possible by funding from the Michigan Health Endowment Fund.

For Wyoming, Michigan resident Isabel Romero and her family, COVID-19 has meant great loss while being unable to participate in many traditional mourning rituals.

At the start of the pandemic, Romero lost his uncle, Elias Garcia. A month later, his grandfather, Auner Garcia Martínez, died of pneumonia that doctors attributed to COVID-19. Then the virus took hold of Romero’s great aunt and uncle.

“A family member after the death of a family member,” she said. “It’s been tough. It’s still tough on the family.”

Romero traveled to Texas for his grandfather’s funeral. While the service was supposed to be shared online, technical difficulties at the funeral home prevented other family members from connecting. When Romero attended his aunts’ funerals, family members asked him to stream them through Facebook Live – a request Romero understood, but said she also felt uncomfortable.

“I was there to cry with my grandmother,” says Romero. “… I was trying to respect my aunt, her children, her grandchildren, and then you have to pass the camera to film someone who was dead. I wouldn’t want that for my funeral, but it was the only one. way to allow our family and friends to view the services. “
Isabel Romero is holding a pillow made from a shirt that belonged to her grandfather, who died of COVID-19.
Like Romero, the pandemic has forced many Michiganders to cry in extremely unusual ways, as people have had to attend masked and distanced funerals or memorial services, via Zoom, or not at all. Organizations across Michigan have worked to support the grieving Michiganders under unprecedented circumstances.

Groups of adults facilitate good mourning

Even before the pandemic, Michigan HospiceCDM’s grief support groups have helped people overcome their grief – and there is now more need than ever. When face-to-face grief support became impossible, the groups went online, with the positive result of being available to more people in more places in Michigan.

“There are elements unique to this type of disaster,” says Wes Lawton, Director of Bereavement Support Services at the HOM. “It’s a new virus. The losses were unexpected. There are specific types of anger or guilt ahead. Everyone feels that their loss could have been avoided if people had taken precautions. ‘they themselves propagated it.

When face-to-face group meetings were suspended due to COVID-19, HOM began providing customers with tablets loaded with information relevant to their needs, as well as Zoom and other apps to allow them to connect. with their support groups.

“Connecting this way is still not ideal, but it’s way better than no contact at all,” Lawton says. “It brings a little more peace and closure with death.”
Wes Lawton.
HOM hosts nearly a dozen different online bereavement support groups for different populations. For example, a group of young adults that Lawton facilitates supports people in their 20s and 30s.

“They can have young children, be in the early or middle of their careers, and look forward to their future,” Lawton says. “They have to figure out how to make the most of their life; how to heal at this point; maybe find love again, if that’s their situation; or raise children without grandparents.”

Other groups offer comfort specifically to parents of young or adult children, men, and those who have lost a spouse or partner. Lawton notes that last year’s focus on COVID-19 has caused some people who have lost loved ones to other causes to believe their loss is not as significant.

“They may feel like their loved one didn’t get the attention or respect they needed because so much attention was being given to people with this new disease that we didn’t understand,” Lawton says. “So there can be resentment and other kinds of feelings that come with it.”

Secondary losses – the loss of roles, routines and responsibilities that a loved one assumed in people’s lives – also hits grievers hard. HOM’s “Loss from COVID” support group is dealing with all of the different types of losses that the pandemic has caused.

“With the pandemic, we have also faced other types of loss, other than death,” Lawton says. “These losses may not be as great as death, but they overlap and make everyone a little more anxious. Our emotions are a little closer to the surface and we have a harder time receiving support. “

Help children cry

Even though the heartbreak over COVID has affected adults, its consequences for children and young adults will continue to change and reverberate throughout their lives. Romero says his family’s experience of COVID-19 has had a huge impact on his teenage sons.

“It gave them a second outlook on life,” she says. “They realized that lives were being lost.”

JAMA Pediatrics reported that by February 2021, nearly 40,000 American children had lost at least one of their parents to COVID-19. This number does not reflect children who lost more than one parent or children who lost a primary caregiver who was not their parent.

“Radical national reforms are needed to address the health, educational and economic fallout that affects children,” the report warns. “Children bereaved by their parents will also need targeted support to help them overcome their grief, especially during this time of heightened social isolation.”

Ele’s Place, a free healing center in Ann Arbor for grieving children, teens, young adults and their families, has served more children who have lost loved ones to COVID-19.
Kelly Koerner.
“As an organization, we are all learning how the pandemic is changing mourning,” says Kelly Koerner, program director for Ele’s Place. “For many it was more difficult to find a fence. They weren’t able to say goodbye to themselves. That closure has been removed and it is something they will never come back to. have a feeling that our services are going to be needed more than ever. “

“It’s a challenge to go through the regular grieving process,” adds Daniel Layman, CEO of Ele’s Place. “All of this exacerbates the isolation that children feel.”

According to Koerner, children suffer very differently from adults. While adults may sit in sadness for hours and hours, children experience intermittent, spurting grief. Parents are often concerned that children will not cry properly.

“A child might cry and in five minutes want to go out and play with friends. He can’t tolerate sadness and pain for long periods of time, ”says Koerner. “Plus, children are resurrected at every stage of development and at different monumental times – for example, when they’re graduating, going to prom, getting married, or having a child of their own.

Staff at Ele’s Place encourage adults to use hard facts to explain the death of a loved one to a young child. A child will resonate more with information such as “mom’s body has stopped working” rather than “mom is sleeping”.

“If we tell children that mom is sleeping, they may be afraid to fall asleep. If we tell them Mom is in Heaven, they might say, ‘Let’s take a ladder and go upstairs and get her,’ says Koerner. “Children can be very repetitive and ask the same questions over and over again. It is important to be aware, to be understanding and to be patient with them.”

Being unable to express grief through customary traditions such as vigils, visitations, and in-person funeral services makes the process even more difficult.

“The organic and natural supports that occur at funerals are gone,” says Koerner. “Some have done outdoor memorial services, but it still looks a lot different. There isn’t this ability to do those natural hugs and so forth, the supports that we naturally provide to each other. . “

Long road to recovery

Although COVID-19 vaccinations have been rolled out and businesses are reopening, COVID-19 mourning is far from over for many Michiganders. As 2021 arrived, Romero and his family cheered on the New Year, believing COVID-19 was behind them. But on January 2, she tested positive for the virus. She recovered, but her husband caught the virus in May. COVID-19 hit him harder. He developed pneumonia and had to be given intravenous fluids in the emergency room. He now appears to be on the mend.

“It was really scary for me. Here we were with COVID knowing that I lost an uncle, lost a grandparent, lost aunts, but trying to stay positive,” she says. “It’s no joke, losing family members.”

For Romero, the religious heritage of her grandfather and uncle guides her through her grief. His grandfather served as a pastor for 48 years, while his uncle worked as an assistant pastor in a small church he helped found in Mexico.
Isabel Romero is holding a mug with a photo of her uncle, who died of COVID-19.
“Whatever spiritual support you can get, go out and seek it, regardless of faith,” Romero says. “With COVID, I cannot reunite with my cousins, my aunts. It’s even difficult to reunite with my mother because I try to protect her. Being alone is how COVID left us, I feel you need to take comfort with your faith. This is how I comforted myself and how I continue to comfort myself. “

Lawton advises those who are grieving to take care of themselves and seek support.

“In our society, people tend to downplay how difficult grief is. When they do it themselves, they may feel like they should have an easier time when in reality their grief has not been given the attention it needs ”. he says. “If you’ve lost someone or even if you’re just dealing with the result of this pandemic and the way our lives have changed, I encourage you to open up a bit and ask for help. We really need to. from each other, especially this time. “

A freelance writer and editor Estelle Slootmaker is the happiest writings on social justice, wellness and the arts. She is editor-in-chief of development news Fast growing media and chairs The Tree Amigos, Wyoming City Tree Commission. His greatest achievement is his five extraordinary adult children. You can contact Estelle at Estelle.Slootmaker@gmail.com or www.constellations.biz.

Photos of Isabel Romero by Kristina Bird. All other photos courtesy of the Subjects.



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