Fix that glut of 1.1 million jobs in the budget this month, Rishi


A glut of jobs

THE rebound in jobs has been astonishing, defying all doomsday predictions.

It’s a testament to Chancellor Rishi Sunak and the monumental sums he was prepared to invest in leave and other bailouts.

AFP

The rebound in jobs has been astonishing, defying all doomsday predictions, but Rishi Sunak must address the 1.1 million glut this month

The specter of 1970s-style unemployment, universally anticipated once the pandemic struck, has evaporated.

The latest national unemployment figure of 4.5% is not much higher than before Covid. The overall labor total is higher.

And a glut of 1.1 million vacancies seems like a good problem. Unfortunately, it is not the case. Without recruits, many businesses cannot grow and some cannot survive.

And the global shortage of truck drivers is now forcing shipping giants to move away from Felixstowe, which means more shortages in stores.

The personnel crisis and soaring inflation both threaten our recovery – and the IMF has lowered UK growth forecasts, however optimistic they may be.

One lever that the government can use is to lower the rate of degression of universal credit.


This would allow employed claimants to keep more of their salary and possibly persuade them to work more hours.

It would convince those who do not have a job that they would be much better off in a job.

Fix that in the budget this month, Rishi.

Boris chancers

How fast Boris Johnson’s enemies have moved the goalposts now that Covid’s first official report has pulled the mat under their main attacking line.

They used to claim that Boris the Jester dismissed the boffins, ignored Sage and delayed the lockdown to early 2020 with lethal results. It was bad.

Boris Johnson's enemies have moved the goalposts now that the first official Covid report has pulled the mat under their main attacking line

PA

Boris Johnson’s enemies have moved the goalposts now that the first official Covid report has pulled the mat under their main attacking line

Boris had no idea how to deal with an unprecedented plague two months after taking office. So he followed science to the letter. Now that this advice has turned out to be questionable, his critics are outraged that he did not challenge it.

Many serious mistakes were made later, including by the Prime Minister. But how long will those who still harbor Brexit and other grudges travel the past in search of self-gratifying evidence of Boris’ failures?

Labor is eager to look into and frantically retweet every word of next year’s public inquiry. And yet Britain has multiple current and looming issues, like catastrophic NHS waiting lists.

No interest in them?

Crust Fund

NO wonder Insulate Britain sneers at the misery they inflict on commuters. Most of this mob does not need to make a living.

Some are millionaires, others on comfortable retirement. And what about David McKenny, the sly jerk threatening to “start hell” if the nation’s lofts aren’t held up as frantically as he demands?

He has a £ 300,000 house that mum and dad gave him. No mortgage, of course.

Isolate Britain? These privileged and obnoxious snobs are isolated from life.

Susanna Reid argues with Chancellor Rishi Sunak as he talks about her and slams her ‘long’ question


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