Kansas City families help Gaza student attend college in the United States

BEFORE MOHAMMED CAMTOE KANSAS CITY. HE NEVER LEAVE GAZA AND WHEN I ARRIVED HE COULDN’T BELIEVE I WAS REALLY HERE. HE ATTENDED PEMBROKE HILLS AN EXCHANGE STUDENT IN 2017 SHARING THE YEAR BETWEEN TWO HOST FAMILIES MUHAMMAD IS THE CLOSEST THING I HAVE TO A BROTHER HIS HOST SISTER KATE MORTHINGTON GOT TO INTRODUCE HIM IN THE STRUGGLE IN AMERICA WHEN HE IMMEDIATELY COME TO AMERICA ASPECT OF AMERICAN LIFE. SO EY KA PLAYED AT SOCCER. HE PLAYED BASKETBALL. HE BINGE WATCHED ALL SEASONS OF TNEE FRIENDS. NOW BACK IN GAZA.S. THE RECENT CONFLICT HAS BEEN RITGH OUTSIDE MUHAMMAD’S GATE THIS VIDEO SHOWS WHERE A BOMB HIT 150 FEET FROM HIS HOME. I didn’t know if I was gone to be alive in the next moment or not because it’s just H YEAH, THIS IS JUST AS DIFFICULT BEFORE THE Ceasefire. IUL FLY COULD NOT SLEEP THE IKI WOULD STAY. LATE AT NIGHT. JUST CRY AS HER HOST FAMILIES WORRY FOR HIS SAFETY ALL OVER THE WORLD. THEY ARE WORKING TO HELP HER FULFILL HIS DREAM OF ATTENDING CO LLEGE IN THE UNITED STATES ESTABLISHING A GOFUNDME TO HELP COVER THE COSTS COMING TO THE UNITED STATES MEANS A LOT OF BASIC OPPORTUNITIES AND A LOT OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR PEO, SURROUNDINGS. PLWHO ARE READY TO WORK HARD FOR THEM. IT’S JUSTO S RESILIENT. HE REALLY SHOWED ME THAT KE, AS YOU CAN DO EVERYTHING IF YOU PUT YOUR M

Kansas City families help Gaza student attend college in the United States

Mohammad Abuajwa was an exchange student at Pembroke Hill and hopes to return to the United States.

A teenager from Gaza who studied as an exchange student in Kansas City hopes to return to the United States for college. KMBC spoke to their host families in the metro about how they are helping to achieve this. Before Mohammad Abuajwa arrived in Kansas City, he had never left Gaza. “When I got there, I couldn’t believe I was really here,” he said via Zoom from his home in Gaza. He traveled to Kansas City as an exchange student in 2017 to attend Pembroke Hill for his freshman year. “It was a beautiful city, I liked everything,” he said. Mohammad divided his year between two host families, one of whom was student Kate Northington. “Mohammad is the closest thing I have to a brother,” she said. Northington was able to introduce him to life in America. “When he came, he wanted to immerse himself in every possible aspect of American life… he played football, he played basketball,” she said. “He’s overwatched 10 seasons are friends,” Northington said with a laugh. “We were very impressed with his work ethic,” said Carmen Blatter Pfluger, whose family also welcomed Mohammad. She said she learned as much from him as from his family. “It was good to share, it gives an understanding that you didn’t have before,” she said. “It’s good to have that perspective and it’s an open mind, it broadens the horizon.” Back in Gaza, the recent conflict unfolded right outside Mohammad’s doorstep. A video shared with KMBC 9 shows where a bomb hit 50 meters from his home. “It was scary,” he said. “I didn’t know if I was going to be alive in the next moment or not because it’s like that, it’s just how hard it was.” He added: “There were many nights when the bombing continued indefinitely.” “Before the ceasefire, I couldn’t sleep completely,” Northington said. “I was staying up late at night, just crying.” She added: “I think a lot of people, even people who knew Mohammed while he was here, think, ‘Oh, that’s kind of distant from us’ … it’s just very scary to ‘hear everything that’s going on there when it’s so close to it all. As Mohammad’s host families worry for his safety around the world, they work to help him realize his dream of going to college in the United States. “Coming to the United States means a lot of opportunities … especially for people who are willing to work hard for them,” Mohammad said. He was accepted to the University of Bridgewater in Virginia, and his host families at KC set up a GoFundMe to help cover the costs. “I know his hard work, he studied a lot and he deserves it,” said Blatter Pfluger. “He’s resilient,” Northington said. “He really showed me that you can do anything if you think about it.” Mohammad hopes to specialize in environmental studies or computer science. If you would like to donate on their GoFundMe page, click here.

A teenager from Gaza who studied as an exchange student in Kansas City hopes to return to the United States for college. KMBC spoke to their host families in the metro about how they are helping to achieve this.

Before Mohammad Abuajwa arrived in Kansas City, he had never left Gaza. “When I got there, I couldn’t believe I was really here,” he said via Zoom from his home in Gaza. He traveled to Kansas City as an exchange student in 2017 to attend Pembroke Hill for his freshman year. “It was a beautiful city, I liked everything,” he said.

Mohammad divided his year between two host families, one of whom was student Kate Northington. “Mohammad is the closest thing I have to a brother,” she said. Northington was able to introduce him to life in America. “When he came, he wanted to immerse himself in every possible aspect of American life… he played football, he played basketball,” she said. “He’s overwatched 10 seasons are friends,” Northington said with a laugh.

“We were very impressed with his work ethic,” said Carmen Blatter Pfluger, whose family also welcomed Mohammad. She said she learned as much from him as from his family. “It was good to share, it gives an understanding that you didn’t have before,” she said. “It’s good to have that perspective and it’s an open mind, it broadens the horizon.”

Back in Gaza, the recent conflict unfolded right outside Mohammad’s doorstep. A video shared with KMBC 9 shows where a bomb hit 50 meters from his home. “It was scary,” he said. “I didn’t know if I was going to be alive in the next moment or not because it’s like that, it’s just how hard it was.” He added: “There were many nights when the bombing continued indefinitely.”

“Before the ceasefire, I couldn’t sleep completely,” Northington said. “I was staying up late at night, just crying.” She added: “I think a lot of people, even people who knew Mohammed while he was here, think, ‘Oh, that’s kind of distant from us’ … it’s just very scary to ‘hear everything that’s going on there when it’s so close to it all.

As Mohammad’s host families worry for his safety around the world, they work to help him realize his dream of going to college in the United States. “Coming to the United States means a lot of opportunities … especially for people who are willing to work hard for them,” Mohammad said.

He was accepted to the University of Bridgewater in Virginia, and his host families at KC set up a GoFundMe to help cover the costs. “I know his hard work, he studied a lot and he deserves it,” said Blatter Pfluger.

“He’s resilient,” Northington said. “He really showed me that you can do anything if you think about it.”

Mohammad hopes to specialize in environmental studies or computer science. If you would like to donate on their GoFundMe page, click here.



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